SCRIBE: Artist of the Written Word Review [GIVEAWAY – closed]

John Stevens: SCRIBE: Artist of the Written Word Review

Scribe: Artist of the Written Word | John Stevens

Available at John Neal Booksellers

Many eager learners of calligraphy today do not think twice about spending a couple hundred dollars for an online or beginner’s workshop to gain access to coveted secrets of the craft and trade. But many do hesitate to spend even a fraction of that on a book. However, I believe anyone who loves the calligraphic arts and is serious about their pursuit of learning calligraphy should purchase SCRIBE: Artist of the Written Word by John Stevens. This is especially true for those considering calligraphy as a business.

Not only is SCRIBE bursting at the seams with the gorgeous and diverse work of the mega-talented John Stevens, but the book also contains some of the best narrative about the art form I have ever read. SCRIBE is not a “how-to” book but an impressive portfolio of John’s lifework, interspersed with savory paragraphs of expert knowledge regarding the principles, rather than the techniques, of calligraphy. John endeavors to elevate all forms of this expressive and functional art – no matter the style of calligraphy, the tool used, or a work’s purposeful use.

He jumps in by discussing the word “calligraphy” itself and the word’s inability to express everything that is encompassed by our art today or how it will be influenced in the future as a craft and art form. He implores us to not think in terms of dividing calligraphy by trends, styles, or genres, but rather to realize that quality is what really matters. He states, “thinking in terms of tools or styles is a mistaken idea, as it does not tell us anything about the quality of the form or the work….Comparing genres is different than looking at quality.”

And quality is something John knows. The book, itself a quality publication, is full of amazing contemporary and classic calligraphy: Roman, Italic, Copperplate, and Fraktur, as well as brush lettering, gestural lettering, calligrams, and more. Page after page, John’s work beholds both expertly executed design and true mastery of calligraphy as an art form. Each and every piece is a study of quality work and inspires contemplation of what makes it so successful. And the diversity of letterforms is truly astounding.

However, I am enthralled as much by the narrative as by John’s visual gallery. He gives such incredible insight into form, rhythm, movement, content, design, and implementing the use of calligraphy that I feel I should have paid tuition as well as the price of the book. He writes, “Simply possessing a nice hand such as Italic or Uncial is admirable, but is that the real goal? Practice and study are necessary, yet how to put it all together is the bigger topic…[C]alligraphers are striving toward more thoughtful connection to meaning and intention, beyond the merely beautiful or decorative.”

John speaks in-depth of cultivating an appreciation for the lettering arts and how to expand on the “make it simple” teaching of calligraphy. He states, “If we cultivated the appreciation of form, content, and design from the beginning, then we would move the conversation away from ‘perfect penmanship and pretty poems’ toward a more vibrant expression.” While he is not against beginning and basic classes, he explains in order to develop calligraphy, we need to be teaching at a higher level than where we currently are. His ideal in teaching is “to achieve a fine balance of visual language, letterform development, design with content, and mastery of tools.”

SCRIBE reveals invaluable descriptions of the exercises John uses when teaching the progression from fundamental forms to developing variations. While he embraces the form, beauty, and quality of traditional work such as Italic, he encourages us to move beyond specific historical scripts to create almost endless possibilities of exploration and variation. He also discusses the importance of learning design and how to use the space as effectively and powerfully as we can.

John shares many secrets about, well, everything. In addition to the process of learning, he devotes an entire chapter to the “Working Calligrapher,” which includes creating one-of-a-kind pieces and the intricacies of working with clients, as well as working as a designer, invitation work, product calligraphy, wood and stone lettering, logos, certificates, and how he began his business. He shares page after page of beautiful, inspiring examples of his work. He closes the book with information about Cheerio Calligraphy Retreats and his approach and ideals as a teacher.

Beyond the discussion of modern versus traditional, beyond a compilation of gifted work, this book dives deep into what makes beautiful and quality calligraphy, and how we can both carry on and elevate the craft. I highly recommend you invest both the money to buy it and the time to read it.


– – – – – – – – – -GIVEAWAY CLOSED- – – – – – – – –

John Neal Bookseller and Flourish Forum have teamed up to give away a free copy of SCRIBE: Artist of the Written Word by John Stevens. [GIVEAWAY CLOSED.] Don’t forget to follow @FlourishForum and @JohnNealBookseller on Instagram. The lucky recipient will be was selected on Friday, November 6, 2015, after 11:59 pm.

One entry per person. For Instagram entrants: per Instagram rules, this is in no way sponsored, administered, or associated with Instagram, Inc. By entering, entrants confirm they are 14+ years of age, release Instagram of responsibility, and agree to Instagram’s terms of use.

P.S. SCRIBE: Artist of the Written Word would make a great holiday gift for you and for the letter lovers in your life!


—— UPDATE ———-

The lucky winner was:

SCRIBE Winner 2015


Calligraphy: Share the Craft, Preserve the Trade

Blog Post from theflourishforum.comThere is an interesting distinction between the senses in the ability to judge quality. Though tastes are vastly different, most people will know a good gourmet meal when they eat one or recognize an out-of-tune song when they hear it. But when it comes to the visual arts, there is a much wider, more subjective range, of what constitutes quality. We can see art but our thought processes and collective experiences combine to interpret the judgment of what we see.

With calligraphy, photography, and many other visual arts, there are two common things which make the business a little more vague: the ease of its accessibility in both producing and offering it as a business, and the seeming inability for many viewers to discern quality work. We can certainly look at some art and know instantly it is “good.” But there are many people who still scratch their head at artwork that hangs in galleries around the world which don’t really look like they took much skill but have broad appeal and are often highly valued. This can be seen in a variety of visual arts, including photography and calligraphy.

I have held a camera in my hand for about the same time I have held a calligraphy pen. Through high school and college, I spent hours in the darkroom developing my own prints and spent countless dollars on film and developing. Prior to launching my calligraphy business, I was already earning income as a photographer. I was one of the first calligraphers with a website and one of the first photographers in my area to “go digital.” The invention of the digital camera walked hand-in-hand with the rise of the internet. Thus a whole new group of people who didn’t have the desire, time, or money to learn the intricacies of a manual camera, developing film, and/or printing photographs could now become photographers.

What we saw with that was a huge range in the quality of work being produced. Those of us who had already been at it for years and knew the difference between an F-stop, ISO, and shutter speed thought, ‘they’ll never stay in business because they can’t offer the quality we can.’

Two interesting things happened. First, some people who had never picked up a camera before became amazing photographers producing some enviable work virtually over night. But second, and more so, we learned many customers could not or did not discern what made a quality portrait. We watched in earnest as our business dwindled as every mother with a camera opened up shop down the street. Fast forward fifteen years later and many good quality, professional photographers are now out of business. Sure, there is still a market for photographers and always will be, but it is a much smaller one as brides and grooms have friends take wedding photos with their phones, moms can now shoot their own children’s portraits with a digital camera, and most other school or major events are overwhelmed with amateur paparazzi.

Following a few years behind, and previously much more unknown, calligraphy is now experiencing a similar internet heyday as more and more enthusiasts pick up a pen. This is great in terms of the love of our craft and sharing that love with others, but perhaps not so good in terms of being able to make a living as a professional calligrapher. Apart from its accessibility, in comparison to other work-from-home trades, the practice of calligraphy takes very little supplies or money to get started. This makes it very appealing to the enormous group of young adults looking for ways to earn income in a challenging job market or while juggling the demands of raising children. And with the creation of “modern” calligraphy, nor is much time necessary in terms of learning the techniques either.

Like with any artist trade, there will always be varying levels of skill, talent, and experience. For the most part — of course there are always exceptions — time, money, and dedication spent on the craft will follow the adage of ‘you reap what you sow.’ However, as the past few years have shown us, with modern calligraphy, (as it was for photography) this isn’t always true. There are some extremely successful modern calligraphers who still make some more traditional scribes sit and scratch their head as they wonder why. (And kudos to them for whatever media, marketing brilliance, or sheer creative genius allowed them to use their skill successfully in a whole new way!)

Additionally, the internet has not only accelerated the spread of calligraphy but also made learning it easier. Over the decades previous to the world wide web, the exposure to calligraphy was few and far between, and instructional books and classes were minimal. Today, eager scribes-to-be can see literally thousands of examples and videos allowing a much swifter learning curve. I’ve watched in awe as some artists on Instagram have learned and perfected Engrosser’s script in just over a year; something that took me years to learn and two decades later I’m still trying to improve.

As we see the rapidly changing environment, easier-to-use nibs, a plethora of paper choices, and  accessibility to learning options, new people are picking up the pen daily. This is both exciting and frightening. It’s exciting to finally have people even know what calligraphy is, let alone share your passion for it. It’s scary because the market for calligraphy was small to begin with and we all know what happens to trends — they die a quick death after everyone becomes entirely sick of it. History has shown us traditional calligraphy will always stand the test of time. The question is, will modern calligraphy drag the entire art form down with it when (or if) it becomes passé.

It’s clear there is a calligraphy trend happening or more definitively, a new calligraphy era driven by modern styles. And with good reason. It’s energetic, fresh, and people resonate with its less formal appeal. It makes a once formidable looking craft in terms of learning, more approachable, just as digital cameras did for photography.

Since I love and practice both traditional and modern calligraphy, one of the things I desired to do with Flourish was bridge the gap between modern and traditional calligraphers. I believed us to all be the same in our love and pursuit of lettering. But as time goes forward, one distinction has become very clear. Whether they create more traditional styles like Copperplate, Gothic, or Italic, and/or other contemporary styles of pointed pen, generally traditional calligraphers study the craft, the history, the tools, multiple styles, and moreover, are dedicated students and stewards of the trade. Small industry circles equated to careful, thoughtful action within the community in terms of teaching or business. Many have spent decades learning and practicing before ever considering starting a business or teaching others.

Modern calligraphers are more apt to practice one style of their own pointed pen script, spend minimal time studying letter forms (as modern calligraphy has no one form), and feel ready to start a business or teach others soon after picking up a pen. Overall, I’m painting with a narrow brush and there can be exceptions to both, however, this has been my and others, general observations over the past few years. Not to say there aren’t those who are dedicated students or contemplative in regards to business, there definitely are. Thankfully, the craft of fine calligraphy will be carried forward by the growing segment of newcomers who bridged the gap by starting with modern calligraphy and then decided they wanted to go deeper and learn traditional styles.

The distinction though, also means something else; perhaps something more significant than just the sharing of a love of letters. The craft and trade of traditional calligraphy takes years, if not decades to learn, hone, and share. The basics of modern calligraphy can be learned in a couple of hours and in turn is often sold and taught in rapid succession.

So does it matter? Some would say no as we always need to adapt and change with the times, and like it or not, this is how it works in our world today. I would argue it matters a great deal. It isn’t about the differences between us, it’s about the quality of work we produce and share with others. It’s how what we do effects not just us, but an entire industry. As a calligrapher, I have always felt a great responsibility to do my best to help preserve the integrity of both the craft and the trade. I do not wish to drive a wedge between calligraphers and I would never discourage anyone from pursuing their dreams. Nor do I think one must study for years before deciding they want to start a calligraphy business.

However, I hope people will take an honest look at their work, solicit constructive and forthright feedback from other professionals, and ask themselves if they can offer a quality service and product which upholds the value of not just the market, but the trade as well.

I endeavor to continue to be a good steward so the practice and art of calligraphy will withstand the trend, be more about love of letters than love of money, and continue on as a meaningful expression of words. And I hope those who take up this craft, whether as a traditional or modern calligrapher, will do the same. While it may not matter to some, it will matter most to those who have made their living as a modern day scribe, those who have dedicated a lifetime to its study, and those who truly love not just the look of any given script, but the tradition and beauty of the craft itself.




Happy New Year!

Happy New Year Flourish Friends!

Just a quick note to say hope you all have a fantastic new year filled with fun, family, and flourishing! In honor of new years (and staying up late to wait for my teenager to come home safely), I created a mini-tutorial of Tips for Calligraphy & Design. I also added a new board called, Design & Layout where members can share their design tips, secrets, and examples.

Design Tips for Calligraphers

For all you new members, this is just one of many tutorials at Flourish. If you are a new member, please be sure to check out the Copperplate Tutorial video series in the Pointed Pen Nirvana section.

So grateful to all of the wonderful members at Flourish for answering questions, sharing information, and spreading the love of lettering! 2014 has been a great year!

Happy 2015!


New 2015 Sharing & Caring Exchanges Announced!

As the year draws to a close, I am relishing in all the new friends made, new knowledge gained, and pure joy Flourish forum members have spread throughout the globe.

It’s been equally as fun preparing for the new year ahead. I’ve updated the homepage with some new colors and a new look. And I’ve published our new Sharing & Caring Exchanges for 2015!

This year’s exchanges were a smashing success and members shared beautiful calligraphy all over the world. In total, we sent over 2,000 calligraphed envelopes and cards! Next year promises to be even bigger with lots of fun themes and opportunities to share our creativity and love for calligraphy.

You must be a member to participate so if you haven’t registered yet, sign up now. Our first exchange, the ever popular Valentine’s Exchange has just opened up for sign ups and our first ever Advanced Exchange, “Mimic a Master” has just opened up as well.

Wishing everyone a very happy New Year with much health, happiness, and success in 2015!

Flourish Forum Calligraphy Exchanges



Fantastic Year at Flourish!

Hi Flourish Friends!

It’s hard to believe Flourish is now one year old! And what an amazing year it has been. We now have over 2,600 members and are growing daily. Our members are amazing. I am continually impressed with the gracious way in which everyone shares and cares here at Flourish, from welcoming new members, to helping with questions, to just being a friend. Calligraphers are the nicest people!

We’ve had a fabulous year with awesome tutorials and even better calligraphy exchanges. Every exchange is such a delight. We know getting beautiful mail is the best way to brighten someone’s day! Our holiday exchange was the largest to date with almost 100 participants! Next year’s exchanges look to be even better with some creative topics and fun ideas!

Now that the year is coming to a close, I hope to freshen up the place a bit in the very near future, so look for updates and additions soon. As always, I welcome any input for changes, improvements, etc. Just drop me an email or PM.

Lastly, if you haven’t ordered yet or you’d like to send a gift to a letter lover in your life, Dasherie Magazine is still shipping right up until the holidays!

Dasherie Magazine | Issue 2

I hope you all have a wonderful holiday and I wish you all the best success, happiness, and good health in 2015!



UPPERCASE Magazine #23 – “The Calligraphy Issue”

This is one of those “pinch me” moments.

I am a HUGE fan of UPPERCASE Magazine which is published, edited, and designed by Janine Vangool. Janine is seriously a creative genius. Issue after issue is so incredibly inspiring and so full of creative content. It is really quite remarkable how one person can do all that she does and do it so well.

So you can imagine how excited I was to see Issue 23 was scheduled to be “The Calligraphy Issue.” But you can’t imagine how over the moon I was to be asked for a feature. I am incredibly humbled to be included among some of the calligraphers I most admire.

I highly recommend you purchase not just this issue, but a full subscription. And as a sweet deal to all you letter lovers out there, Janine has offered this fabulous discount. Use the discount code, “letterlove” for $15 off subscriptions until October 31st. You can purchase here.

Erica McPhee feature in UPPERCASE #23


2,000 members and growing!

Hello Flourishing Friends!

It’s been a bit since I’ve posted. We were busy moving our home and my studio the past couple of weeks. It took over a week to get internet and I still don’t have a phone line for some strange reason. But we are making do. My studio is yet to be set up or unpacked but hopefully that will happen this week. Thus I feel very discombobulated and out of sorts.

In any event, things are moving along at Flourish. I have posted a poll for the upcoming Sharing & Caring Exchanges for 2015. Please vote if you would like to participate in exchanges next year. We already have 54 members signed up for our upcoming Holiday Exchange! This is our biggest exchange yet and promises to be lots of fun!

We now have well over 2,000 members and we are approaching 21,000 posts! How is that for a great first year?!

I am hard at work on the next issue of Dasherie which will be ready to ship in late November. It is bursting with awesome tutorials and so much gorgeous calligraphy! I pinch myself that I get to see all this beautiful lettering in one place. Once on its way, I will be refocusing on Flourish and hoping to implement some new changes and tutorials for 2015. As always, I welcome any input and/or suggestions on how to make Flourish even better.

Happy October!




Dasherie Magazine and Flourish Forum on Martha Stewart American Made!

Hi Flourish Friends!

So Dasherie Magazine has thrown its hat into the ring for the Martha Stewart American Made award! Please click on the badge link below to visit our page and share on Facebook and Twitter. Like the video on YouTube and help Dasherie become a finalist for the grand prize! The more shares and likes, the better our chances! Share with all of your friends and family and ask them to share and like, too, if you’d like!

Like us on Facebook!

Follow us on Instagram!

Follow us on Twitter!

Don’t miss the video and read about Flourish Forum in the Martha Stewart profile! :-)

I just want to take a moment and say thank you for all of the amazing feedback and support for Dasherie and the Flourish Forum. This is a dream come true for me and it would not have happened without the amazing people in the calligraphy community and all of my friends and family. From the bottom of my heart — thank you for your support!

Martha Stewart - American Made 2014 - Nominee Badge


Dasherie Magazine now available for preorder!

Hello My Flourish Friends,

We now have almost 1,500 members in our calligraphy community! Flourish is a wonderful place to talk about calligraphy and get support from calligraphy friends. Those friendships are reaching far beyond calligraphy to become what I am sure will be life long bonds for many. I am both humbled and thrilled to have created this place for us to gather. But it is the wonderful people who have really made Flourish flourish! :-)

With that, I would like to apologize for not being more present on the forum the past couple of weeks. As most of you know, I have been working literally night and day to prepare for the release of my new calligraphy magazine, Dasherie. Many people have asked what Dasherie is all about so I would like to share more with you.

Dasherie Magazine is a new print magazine and is the only magazine dedicated solely to the art of calligraphy and hand lettering. Our debut issue features over 25 artists and over 100 images of beautiful calligraphy. Dasherie provides inspiration for artists and a fabulous reference for brides and other event planners looking for fine hand lettering ideas and products to make all the details extra special. So it is both a showcase and a way to connect those looking for calligraphy with those who do calligraphy!

Dasherie is unlike any other calligraphy journal or magazine. It is a “style” magazine along the lines of other bridal or niche magazines like sewing, scrapbooking, or the arts. It is a 100 page, 4-color, printed magazine filled with high quality images of the finest calligraphy offered around the globe. We also feature full length articles with Artist features, DIY how-to’s, and more. I’m sharing a sneak peak below of one of our spreads in the first issue featuring the beautiful calligraphy of Joy Fairclough, of Studio French Blue.

So share the news with all your letter loving friends! I hope you will pre-order yours today and enjoy it with me!



Dasherie Magazine | For Hearts that Love Letters


How far we’ve come!

Now that the video tutorials for pointed pen have wound down, I have been concentrating on bringing Dasherie Magazine to the calligraphy community. The first issue is overflowing with gorgeous calligraphy. If you love letters, this is a can’t miss issue. I will be posting more details about how to purchase the premiere issue very soon.

In the meantime, the wonderful thing about procrastinating now is that I can still be doing my job by procrastinating on the Flourish Forum! The forum has now welcomed over 1,300 members! And I would like to take the time to say thank you to all the wonderful letter lovers who have joined our community. This is an amazing group of generous and kind people and I am truly blessed to call you all friend.

Flourish has had 9,300 posts! We are welcoming almost 10 new members every day! Hooray! This surely demonstrates calligraphy is alive and well! With so many members and all the wonderful posts it is no longer possible for me to keep up and respond to every post. This is a good thing as this community is about all of you – not me! But I would like to let you know if you have posted and I haven’t responded it is solely because I haven’t had time to yet. I do hope to be able to continue reading every post even if I can’t respond.

I’ve been working on my Pangrams that Make Sense series. This is number 4 in the series. Having a 16 year old in the house, I came up with this ditty which still makes me giggle! The style is a pointed pen variation created by Mike Kecseg. Mike’s copperplate variations are really one of the forerunners to the contemporary/modern calligraphy movement. If you ever have an opportunity to take one of his classes I HIGHLY recommend it!

Pangrams that Make Sense, #4

Last but not least, thank you to all the fabulous members who continue to greet our newcomers by posting hello in the introduction board. Even if you just say a quick ‘hi and welcome’ it means a great deal to newcomers to feel recognized and welcomed by the group. And a very big thank you to all our “regulars” who are so kind and respond to questions and posts with enthusiasm.

Things are flourishing at Flourish!