Author Topic: Learning foundational.  (Read 655 times)

Offline Ken Fraser

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Re: Learning foundational.
« Reply #15 on: April 20, 2017, 05:40:14 PM »
Compared to the original Edward Johnston examples of Foundational Hand, I was interested to see that Sheila Waters and others follow the more recent trend of more generous inter-letter spacing. Whilst I agree that the effect is possibly more pleasing and easier to read, it lacks some of the impact of the historic examples IMO.
For reasons of copyright, I am reluctant to post Johnston's examples here*, but I would humbly suggest that my recently posted "Foundational Hand" examples are closer to the original style.

*see reply #17

Ken
« Last Edit: April 21, 2017, 03:16:29 AM by Ken Fraser »

Offline KrzysiekS

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Re: Learning foundational.
« Reply #16 on: April 21, 2017, 01:45:36 AM »
Thank You for this input.

Actually, as Edward Johnston died more than 70 years ago, I think that copyright for his works already expired, but I'm not a lawyer.

I like regularity of texture produced with more generous inter-letter spacing, but if time allows I try to write a practice with tighter spacing.

Offline Ken Fraser

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Re: Learning foundational.
« Reply #17 on: April 21, 2017, 03:13:53 AM »
Actually, as Edward Johnston died more than 70 years ago, I think that copyright for his works already expired, but I'm not a lawyer.

OK  Here is an example of original writing by Edward Johnston in his Foundational style.

« Last Edit: April 21, 2017, 03:21:29 AM by Ken Fraser »

Offline AndyT

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Re: Learning foundational.
« Reply #18 on: April 21, 2017, 06:49:45 AM »
Although Foundational is a style in its own right and very much Johnston's creation, it's interesting to compare his writing to the source material, the Ramsey Psalter.  Here's a page courtesy of the British Library, via Patricia Lovett:



And attached is a longer sample by Johnston, from the Book of Sample Scripts.  Looking at the two side by side there isn't all that much in it as far as the spacing goes, but Johnners seems to have been keen on running one letter into the next when the opportunity arose, creating more semi-enclosed negative spaces.  That probably contributes a lot to the dense appearance.  I haven't paid all that much attention to Foundational, but it's striking that you can spot Johnston's work a mile off - maybe it's the spacing which does that.

Offline Ken Fraser

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Re: Learning foundational.
« Reply #19 on: April 21, 2017, 08:07:23 AM »
....but Johnners seems to have been keen on running one letter into the next when the opportunity arose, creating more semi-enclosed negative spaces.  That probably contributes a lot to the dense appearance.  I haven't paid all that much attention to Foundational, but it's striking that you can spot Johnston's work a mile off - maybe it's the spacing which does that.

I have no problem with the modern adaptation of the script with more generous inter-letter spacing - in fact I agree that it is probably easier to read and attractive in its own right. My point is that it isn't the script devised by Johnston and it's misleading to maintain that it's "Johnston's Foundational script" when it is clearly different.  In this example, the spacing isn't just tight, it's non-existent in a couple of places with letters overlapping. I think that this density is part of the style. In fact, Johnston had a propensity for close or non-existing spacing in much of his writing including in his handwriting.
« Last Edit: April 21, 2017, 08:26:14 AM by Ken Fraser »

Offline InkyFingers

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Re: Learning foundational.
« Reply #20 on: April 21, 2017, 09:05:30 AM »
"them" is so much Chancery minus the interspacing and uprighted, and rounded...Reminds me of a Spaniard.

That Rustic Roman is beautiful.

Ramsey Psalter is beautiful as this script is a book hand and compression (sin-interletter spacing) is beauty.  Sorry, I am all Gothic.

Sorry for the diversion.
« Last Edit: April 21, 2017, 09:10:42 AM by InkyFingers »