Recent Posts

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Spencerian Script / Re: Practice with ballpoint pen
« Last post by himasf on Today at 03:10:00 PM »
Reviving a 2-yr old(!) thread  ;D
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Introductions / Re: Namaste from India
« Last post by cejohnson on Today at 12:47:23 PM »
Gentle greetings and welcome.

Your Instagram is inspiring; you are doing beautiful work. This is a great forum of talent and everyone shares their experience and provide tips on improvements at any stage of learning.

Namaste,
Catherine
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Coffee & Nib-bles / Can anyone help
« Last post by Diane Bennett on Today at 07:11:38 AM »
Hi everyone,

Firstly, I have just started to learn watercolours and want to sign up to online classes.  Could anyone suggest a good one as there are so many out there.

Second, most tutorials recommend brushes from silver brush, I have searched for a supplier in the UK and found only one supplier with very limited stock, if any.  I when to order from the US and nearly passed out at the shipping cost, $60. 

Can anyone suggest where I can get these brushes from without the silly shipping cost.

I have emailed silver brush for other UK suppliers but heard nothing so assuming there are no others.

Thanks

Diane

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Open Flourish | General Discussion / Re: Rudolf Koch
« Last post by JERRY TRESSER on July 20, 2018, 06:12:04 PM »
Insofar as Neuland and Koch specifically, his work on that particular hand was on metal plates. An angular Neuland especially at circular letters. D, C, O, P, R  Not sure what instrument he was using. I believe that the lettering was developed  on or about 1923.  Neuland has Roman underpinning in its foundation.  If you were to chizil away the broad strokes , surprisingly you will find skeletal letters based on Geometric forms which were Roman in design... He died at age 59 from a heart attack.   As a matter of fact, its a hand i also enjoy. Here is a flyer for an up and coming workshop on this hand.
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Tools & Supplies / Re: Iron Gall Ink - long term stability
« Last post by LeonieS on July 20, 2018, 06:04:38 PM »
Thanks Andrew. Very interesting.  Yes, the paper choice is also crucial. I have seen paper that is hundreds of years old without any discoloration at all. Usually these were made with rag fibres.  In the pre-wood pulp days, they would soak rags (mostly cotton and linen  back then) in lime to soften the fibres for pulping.  Because the was alkaline, it resulted in very good quality paper.  The worst thing that ever happened for paper quality was the shift to wood pulp, which was full of lignin (very acidic).   Great to hear that today's inks are more stable :)
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Coffee & Nib-bles / Re: Odd and Fun Things from the Past
« Last post by AAAndrew on July 20, 2018, 04:27:30 PM »
Regards the banjo:  ...  Good for old-timey music, with that open back. Not so good imho for bluegrass.

Just depends on how loud you want it to be. My son plays an open-back Deering and his training is bluegrass in the Scruggs style.  If you're in a band, you'll need a closed back to get the full voice, but the open back does give a nice sweet tone.

Here in North Carolina is a good place to hear a banjo from time to time.  ;D

Here's another one. It's not very clear, and I wish I could find the original source, but it's from about 1890, and it reminded me of a chain of cheap car painting shops here in the US back in the 70's, I think. They advertised you could get your whole car painted for $100. Here's the earlier version.

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Coffee & Nib-bles / Re: Odd and Fun Things from the Past
« Last post by AnasaziWrites on July 20, 2018, 03:44:02 PM »
Regards the banjo:  what's really unusual is the fact it's a 5 string, not the more common (at that time) four string. Most of the 4 strings go for well under $1000. With that carving, it may fetch more than 3K if it were for sale now.
Good for old-timey music, with that open back. Not so good imho for bluegrass.
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Coffee & Nib-bles / Re: Odd and Fun Things from the Past
« Last post by KristinT on July 20, 2018, 01:28:16 PM »
That marriage announcement reads like quite the burn on Mrs. Earnest!

That banjo is gorgeous!  What a showpiece.  I wonder if anyone found that model very practical to play, as none of that ornamentation is remotely necessary.  I'm fortunate enough to own a beautiful bowl back mandolin from the early 1900s, and truly, antique instruments are delightful to handle.  Thank you for sharing these!
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Coffee & Nib-bles / Re: Odd and Fun Things from the Past
« Last post by AAAndrew on July 20, 2018, 11:12:53 AM »
From an 1831 newspaper.

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Coffee & Nib-bles / Re: Odd and Fun Things from the Past
« Last post by AAAndrew on July 20, 2018, 10:16:39 AM »
The fanciest banjo I've ever seen. Stewart made many banjos, but this was their fanciest. This was $125 in 1880, about $3000 today.

Interestingly, before microphones and amplification, banjos were preferred for bands instead of guitars because they're louder. Banjos were, at one time, considered even a classical instrument and what we could call classical music today was written for banjo orchestras.

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