Author Topic: Modern Calligraphy, Skill, and the Test of Time  (Read 21519 times)

Offline JanisTX

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Re: Modern Calligraphy, Skill, and the Test of Time
« Reply #90 on: April 04, 2015, 08:37:51 PM »
Janis you weren't by any chance a Tridelta were you?
NO! I was Gamma
Phi Beta!!

Offline Elizabeth O.

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Re: Modern Calligraphy, Skill, and the Test of Time
« Reply #91 on: April 05, 2015, 08:36:52 AM »
Janis.  I was in Gamma Phi, too!!!  ;D ;D ;D

If only there were crescent moon and pink carnation emojis!  ;)
All the best -- E.O.

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Offline idrawletters

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Re: Modern Calligraphy, Skill, and the Test of Time
« Reply #92 on: April 06, 2015, 04:38:47 AM »
Janis you weren't by any chance a Tridelta were you?
NO! I was Gamma
Phi Beta!!

Lol eek! :-X

We had crescent moons too, though I guess it wasn't our main symbol :)
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Offline ericp

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Re: Modern Calligraphy, Skill, and the Test of Time
« Reply #93 on: April 09, 2015, 02:01:22 PM »
IMHO, for amateurs or enlightened connoisseurs, the subject of trends is not important.  All we want is to have fun and learn and grow.

For professionals, however, it is a different story.  The value of the work on the market may get impacted in a very tangible way.

The music industry these days is facing a similar problem:  what is the source of revenue now that no one buys music anymore, in addition to the fact that now anybody and his cousin can buy a laptop, some music software and whip up "pro-sounding" music at a fraction of the cost (did you hear? Aunt Betty also plays piano in addition to taking pictures).

In music as well as in calligraphy and photograpĥy I suppose, the idea is to have the best portfolio ever, to constantly refine your skills and keep up with the trends.  Just keep doing better than anyone else.  Impressing a customer always pays off, but it is likely (as the reach of the Internet proves) that knowledge and therefore the competition is increasing.

Offline Erica McPhee

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Re: Modern Calligraphy, Skill, and the Test of Time
« Reply #94 on: April 09, 2015, 04:07:01 PM »
(did you hear? Aunt Betty also plays piano in addition to taking pictures).

I agree, excellent post! And that line just cracked me up!  ;D Now Aunt Betty does wedding calligraphy, too! She's so talented!  :o
Truly, Erica
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Offline Ken Fraser

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Re: Modern Calligraphy, Skill, and the Test of Time
« Reply #95 on: November 01, 2015, 06:14:10 PM »
Jumping on the train late but, as a calligraphy newbie that intends to seriously attempt copperplate in the classical sense (6+ months and counting), it even annoys me when my other friends just give up and do modern without respect to the history, fundamentals etcetera and take it so easily. Where here I am furiously trying to learn everything right! Hahaha and they're always looking at me weird/discounting my serious attempts and trivializing calligraphy somehow. It already makes me so mad also on behalf of the serious masters and calligraphers who put their lives and years into this.

Well said.

Offline JERRY TRESSER

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Re: Modern Calligraphy, Skill, and the Test of Time
« Reply #96 on: December 02, 2015, 10:03:13 PM »
Somewhat similar to the other subject which i posted on.  Lettering is based on classical forms which developed for specific uses. the clarity becomes monumental when one looks to Roman caps chiziled into stone and reserved for Caesars. That would be the starting point. However those letter forms were manipulated with a brush. Here our calligraphic introduction was with the broad edged pen. Brush letterers were always referred to as sign painters. Not calligraphers.  That is a historically accurate description but we all know the significance of the power of the brush in contemporary works of art. 

The broad edged pen has historical implications as well. Putting aside the original book hands of the 1st century, Uncial evolved over a 600 year history as a major player in the development of defining the alphabet as it matured through the centuries. By the 8th century the world was introduced to the Caroline hand. With a fully formed lower case alphabet and yet remnants of some letters with Uncial flavors such as N, T, J.  Without going into the entire history of growth in our alphabet, by the 15th century, the broad edged pen ended its development.  Partially due to the new, never before seen, PRINTING PRESS..  The Italic hand which was the offical papal hand of the chancery also known as Italics or Chancery was living on borrowed time. 

The use of the pointed pen was arriving primarily because children for the first time were given primers or small books to learn reading and writing. On a large scale basis it just seemed to make sense and this was the rudiments for the development of a new form of writing that was not restricted to a scribe. 

Two different tools with two different objectives. One historical including documents of monumental importance. Lawed by Caesars and those who now for the first time were learning that the education was no longer limited to the aristocracy.

One really has to look back and see that the broad edged pen was developed to a fulfillment which ended due to modernization. The pointed pen developed for economic purposes. Both requiring skill and imagination not to mention competition especially with the flourishes and control . One just has to look at Fractur and some of the ornate pointed pen lettering. Both requires a very steady knowledge of the instrument, but come from two different mind sets.  This has to be taken into consideration when learning.

 The final question one has to ask is , Where does this lead me ?  Pointed pen lettering is at its best 600 years old and its still pointed pen with various adaptations in pressure.  Broad edged pen lettering covers well over 2000 years of history with development of an alphabet. 26 lead soldiers, influencing the world we live in.  Just food for thought.