Author Topic: Nice example from c. 1860  (Read 427 times)

Offline AAAndrew

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Nice example from c. 1860
« on: December 01, 2017, 09:55:15 AM »
Obviously not typeset. The "t's" are inconsistent, for one thing. But a very nice example nonetheless. It's a good example of the kind of text used in certificates.

Would you call this Engrosser's Script? Copperplate?

It's from the US and was printed in New York City.
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Offline Salman Khattak

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Re: Nice example from c. 1860
« Reply #1 on: December 01, 2017, 08:58:21 PM »
That is definitely written with a pointed flexible nib and is done with strokes used in Engrosser's script.

The script has some elements of the English Roundhand (the 'b' in 'establishment') and the relatively small ascender loop of the 'f' but has many more modern elements such as the secondary shades (made as separate strokes) in the descenders, regular use of entry hairlines and high exit hairlines of terminal letters.

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Offline AAAndrew

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Re: Nice example from c. 1860
« Reply #2 on: December 02, 2017, 08:07:50 AM »
Nice analysis, Salman. It was printed around 1860. I thought it a particularly fine example and thought y'all might appreciate it too. I'll post the whole at some point in the near future.
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