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Cursive Italics

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Blotbot:
I am trying to develop a cursive italics that I can use for writing. Using three strokes to write a letter is driving me nuts when I write my penpals!  So I am researching variations.

First I checked out a book by Lloyd Reynolds, Italic Calligraphy and Handwriting.  On the positive side, he does use a ductus that is condusive to rapid writing.  However, I don't like the way he joins the letters.  The "n" is joined from the top, for example.  I think this saps the energy from the angular letters.

And then there is the Scrittura Italiana style from the Modelli di Calligraphia.  Pages 19-20 in --

https://archive.org/details/modelli_di_caligrahia

I like the way the connections are made, but it is a bit round and has lost some of the italic energy.

Does any one have any other favorite variations?

Elisabeth_M:
Have you looked at Ken Fraser's style?  You can see it in the first exemplar in this thread:  http://theflourishforum.com/forum/index.php?topic=2233.0  In the same thread, there is a Zapf Italic that I think is nice as well.

In terms of historical models, there is La Operina, here:  https://archive.org/stream/laoperinadiludou00arri#page/n3/mode/2up  and Palatino here:  https://archive.org/stream/librodimgiovamba00pala#page/n13/mode/2up  both of which I think are gorgeous.

If you are looking for a modern book, people often recommend this one from Getty Dubay: http://www.handwritingsuccess.com/italic-letters.php.  I am working with this one from Fred Eager:  http://www.amazon.com/The-Italic-Way-Beautiful-Handwriting/dp/002079990X.

Hope that helps!

Blotbot:
Found this very interesting article on classic cursive italics:

How to Judge Italic Handwriting
By A. S. Osley

http://www.italic-handwriting.org/magazine/articles/miscellaneous/judge-italic-handwriting

This person is discussing the advice given by several Renaissance writing masters.  A lot to digest!  Very helpful to those of us who cant read the originals.  I just look at the pictures anyway. I have added a few of the books to The Library for your viewing pleasure. 

AndyT:
Crikey, it's not often you see prose like that in this day and age.  Mr Osley was clearly a man in possession of a well starched collar, so to speak ... I can't see him having much time for modern calligraphy or glittery ink, can you?  All the same he speaks with a great deal of real authority, as well as a pompous voice.  Thank you for another interesting link, Ellen - I enjoyed that.

Scarlet Blue:
In the Exemplar section - Is that David Lodge as in the author David Lodge??? He is one of my favourite authors  :)

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