Author Topic: Ames Lettering Guide  (Read 3146 times)

Offline Blotbot

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Ames Lettering Guide
« on: August 17, 2014, 10:34:36 AM »
Does anyone use an Ames Lettering Guide?

http://www.paperinkarts.com/amesgu.html

I picked one up at my local art supplies store to play with.  It could be used with a straight edge to draw guide lines.  A little hard to get the hang of.

Offline joi

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Re: Ames Lettering Guide
« Reply #1 on: August 17, 2014, 10:44:52 AM »
i have one of these from my drafting days...and it was great.  but i can't use it now because i don't have a slant board with a straight guide or t-square, so i don't use it for lettering now.

Offline Blotbot

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Re: Ames Lettering Guide
« Reply #2 on: August 17, 2014, 10:51:25 AM »
I can see how a slant board would keep it settled against the straight edge.  This is one problem I am having.

Offline Erica McPhee

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Re: Ames Lettering Guide
« Reply #3 on: August 17, 2014, 11:11:02 AM »
We used to use them in class all the time to draw lines. They are a bit tricky to figure out at first but once you learn how it works, it's a great tool!  :)
Warm Regards,
Erica
Lettering & Design Artist
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Offline joi

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Re: Ames Lettering Guide
« Reply #4 on: August 17, 2014, 11:19:33 AM »
I can see how a slant board would keep it settled against the straight edge.  This is one problem I am having.

ellen - that is the exact problem i had...and instead of fighting it i just said this is not the tool for me right now.  but it's still in my box because i used it forever on floor plans and detail drawings to architecturally letter...so it's more a beloved momento now ;)

Offline Lori M

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Re: Ames Lettering Guide
« Reply #5 on: August 17, 2014, 05:18:36 PM »
I like it much better than measuring the distance between lines with a ruler, but I'm not quite sure how to get it to work for Copperplate. Do you just use it to mark the x-heights, and not the ascender/descender lines? Or do you just move the T-square down a little? (It seems like there aren't enough holes to do many lines of Copperplate size at a time.) Hope I'm making sense...

Offline Blotbot

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Re: Ames Lettering Guide
« Reply #6 on: August 17, 2014, 05:41:56 PM »
There are enough holes to make one set of lines with ascender and descender, but then you need to move the ruler down.

Offline Brad franklin

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Re: Ames Lettering Guide
« Reply #7 on: August 17, 2014, 07:47:21 PM »
I have one of these. You can make the lines as far apart as you like. You do two lines however far apart you like then you adjust the wholes to the line and drawn away like this. If this is standard information sorry. If not you have learned a new trick.  You turn the wheel till the lines line up. Then you have your distance then start drawing. I learned it from a calligrapher so if you all ready now sorry.

Offline Lori M

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Re: Ames Lettering Guide
« Reply #8 on: August 17, 2014, 07:58:50 PM »
I can see how a slant board would keep it settled against the straight edge.  This is one problem I am having.

I don't have a slant board either, but my plastic writing mat/pad (a little over 1/4" thick) is just thick enough for me to get a T-square to rest on the edge. I wish I didn't have to move the T-square down for each new set of lines, although it's not that big of a deal.

Offline flourishmetoo

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Re: Ames Lettering Guide
« Reply #9 on: August 17, 2014, 08:07:33 PM »
I purchased one of these but have not figured out how to use it. Thanks Brad for your explanation. Does anyone have a link to a YouTube demonstration?

Offline Brad franklin

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Re: Ames Lettering Guide
« Reply #10 on: August 17, 2014, 08:13:18 PM »
Try this one


Offline flourishmetoo

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Re: Ames Lettering Guide
« Reply #11 on: August 17, 2014, 08:27:51 PM »
Thanks Brad for the video. Do you always calibrate your lines to an existing grid or is there a formula based on a desired x height?

Offline Meredith S

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Re: Ames Lettering Guide
« Reply #12 on: August 17, 2014, 10:10:48 PM »
This is me watching that video:
 ??? hmm?
 ??? What?
 :-\ I don't get it.
 :o Ooooh. *whispers* I want that.

Offline garyn

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Re: Ames Lettering Guide
« Reply #13 on: August 17, 2014, 10:41:16 PM »
Ah so that is what I picked up at an estate sale.
Interesting, and neat.  I guess it will have to wait till I use a drafting board, but thanks for the info.  It will make lines much easier.
Gary

Offline Lori M

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Re: Ames Lettering Guide
« Reply #14 on: August 18, 2014, 02:30:56 AM »
Here's my drafting-board free setup:



I'm sure a drafting board would be much nicer, but my "art mat" is just thick enough that I can use the T-square with it.