Author Topic: WWI Journal page  (Read 1451 times)

Offline Vintage_BE

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WWI Journal page
« on: March 04, 2023, 04:14:06 PM »
Perhaps slightly off topic, but I wanted to share the enclosed picture. It’s the title page of a journal of WWI that was recently donated to a museum here in Flanders. The author (born 1892 and thus 22 yo at the outbreak of the war) later became a well known architect. I am guessing that his handwriting benefited from (or reflects) his architect studies. @sybillevz will be able to analyse this much more correctly but this would seem to be based on the French “Ronde” style. Interesting combination of slanted and vertical script.

Offline Zivio

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Re: WWI Journal page
« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2023, 08:02:38 PM »
... It’s the title page of a journal of WWI that was recently donated to a museum here in Flanders...

Fantastic historical specimen! I love "real" and practical handwriting so much -- this is a beauty!
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Offline Erica McPhee

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Re: WWI Journal page
« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2023, 09:27:26 PM »
I split this into its own topic as it is off topic from Sybille’s original post. Thanks!
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Offline sybillevz

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Re: WWI Journal page
« Reply #3 on: March 05, 2023, 09:04:01 AM »
Indeed this is a the French Ronde, with a slant. Maybe a local variation taught in school or a personal adaptation. I wouldn't say it reflects typical erchitect handwriting, but I haven't seen enough of those to be sure  ;)

At the time, Ronde was used by administration and Anglaise was more of a personal hand. But both were taught in schools, the Ronde probably after the Anglaise because it was more of a professionnal style.

Thank you for sharing!