General Categories > Flourishing

Flourished "Calligraphy"

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Ken Fraser:

Milonguera:
Ken, I'm looking at flourishing (among other aspects of calligraphy) now and saw this beautiful example.  The thing that confuses me and I've not seen explained is WHEN to flourish.  I'm talking about when as in when do you add the flourish in the construction of the letter.  For example, the second "l" has a flourish that is all hairline till the stem of the letter.  Is that flourish put there before the shaded downstroke is made, or is it added after? 

Ken Fraser:

--- Quote from: Milonguera on July 05, 2014, 10:21:48 AM ---Ken, I'm looking at flourishing (among other aspects of calligraphy) now and saw this beautiful example.  The thing that confuses me and I've not seen explained is WHEN to flourish.  I'm talking about when as in when do you add the flourish in the construction of the letter.  For example, the second "l" has a flourish that is all hairline till the stem of the letter.  Is that flourish put there before the shaded downstroke is made, or is it added after?

--- End quote ---



Think of flourishing, not as added before or after a letter is written, but as part of it. In fact, you're creating a variation of the basic letter.

Flourishing a letter can be memorised but is usually planned to an extent. In the example you mentioned, the letter 'l' starts at the top with a flourish and extends to the foot of the letter in one even stroke. I usually try various forms of flourishing in pencil on a separate sheet until I had one which like. I then write it in pencil lightly on the artwork in the correct position and then write the letter in ink in one even movement - not too slow and not too fast. The pencil draft is just a guide, and unlike the letters themselves which have definite proportions, flourishing is flexible, and the difference of a millimetre or so, has no detrimental effect. The pencil line is just an aid to memory, so that you don't hesitate in mid-stroke which inevitably results in jerky flourishing.
 
Sometimes a freehand stroke is added to flourishing for added interest. The flourishing into or out of the letters  is always completed first and then the extra stroke, if required, is added.

Flourishing a piece of work always looks best if the flourishing is an addition to the lettering itself, and doesn't just float around, to fill in space.

Hope this helps.

Ken

AndyT:
That's very helpful Ken, thank you.

Milonguera:

--- Quote from: Ken Fraser on July 06, 2014, 07:57:43 AM ---
--- Quote from: Milonguera on July 05, 2014, 10:21:48 AM ---Ken, I'm looking at flourishing (among other aspects of calligraphy) now and saw this beautiful example.  The thing that confuses me and I've not seen explained is WHEN to flourish.  I'm talking about when as in when do you add the flourish in the construction of the letter.  For example, the second "l" has a flourish that is all hairline till the stem of the letter.  Is that flourish put there before the shaded downstroke is made, or is it added after?

--- End quote ---



Think of flourishing, not as added before or after a letter is written, but as part of it. In fact, you're creating a variation of the basic letter.

Flourishing a letter can be memorised but is usually planned to an extent. In the example you mentioned, the letter 'l' starts at the top with a flourish and extends to the foot of the letter in one even stroke. I usually try various forms of flourishing in pencil on a separate sheet until I had one which like. I then write it in pencil lightly on the artwork in the correct position and then write the letter in ink in one even movement - not too slow and not too fast. The pencil draft is just a guide, and unlike the letters themselves which have definite proportions, flourishing is flexible, and the difference of a millimetre or so, has no detrimental effect. The pencil line is just an aid to memory, so that you don't hesitate in mid-stroke which inevitably results in jerky flourishing.
 
Sometimes a freehand stroke is added to flourishing for added interest. The flourishing into or out of the letters  is always completed first and then the extra stroke, if required, is added.

Flourishing a piece of work always looks best if the flourishing is an addition to the lettering itself, and doesn't just float around, to fill in space.

Hope this helps.

Ken

--- End quote ---

You hope this helps!?  :o  Ken, I feel like I've been given a key that opens the front door of a palace.  Thank You!  (I'm going to post this but if Thank You shows up like I'm seeing it, with gobbeldygook around it, that's a Bold, Italic and Underlined, Thank You!)

Debbie



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