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iPad Pro VS. Surface Pro

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Leanda:
Have been saving my pennies and hope to be able to bag some new hardware very soon. Am really stuck between the pros and cons of the iPad Pro and the Surface Pro. I love what I've seen done with the Apple Pencil and Procreate, but my desktop computer is a dinosaur and needs drastic updating. I want to do a lot of digital work (logos/illustration etc), but am I better off getting the Surface Pro for all-round performace? How does the stylus compare to the Apple Pencil? Would love to hear your experiences with either! :)

tintenfuchs:
I have tried both at friends' places (but I don't own either) and what struck me as very different was the feel of the stylus and pencil. With the Surface, I always felt that a thick piece of glass was between me and the drawing. With the iPad, it felt as if I was drawing directly on the canvas. For me, this makes all the difference since that makes it feel more natural.

Rednaxela:
You might like this blog, which has lots of samples of Spencerian done on an iPad Pro with an Apple Pencil.

http://www.richimages.net

LindaR:
Technology is such a huge investment that you want to be sure youíre getting precisely what you need.  Iíve never tried the Surface Pro, but Iíve been using the iPad Pro, Apple Pencil, and Procreate app for two months and am completely in love with them.  The Apple Pencil and Procreate app seem to work together flawlessly, with zero lag (an issue which seems to be a common problem with many other styluses).  Pressure sensitivity works perfectly, allowing fine hairlines and wide swells.  Procreate brushes (essentially pen nibs) can be modified or created from scratch, so that you can write with precisely the effects you want.  I have a few favorite brushes for pointed pen, as well as some Iíve made for Italic and broad edge work, and they work very nicely.  (If youíd like me to send you a sample of writing, just PM me.)

Give some thought to what programs/apps you would be using (and whether theyíre available for the device youíre considering), as well as the effectiveness of the stylus you would use. Those will be huge factors for your artwork; you donít want to discover after the fact that what you want or need isnít available for your particular device.  Can you go to an Apple Store to put the Pencil through its paces? (Sadly, if they donít have Procreate loaded on their iPads, you wonít get a sense of what you can do, calligraphy-wise.). Can you try out a Surface Pro in a similar fashion?  That might be the best way for you to decide what will work best for you and your hand.  I would buy the iPad Pro and Apple Pencil again in a heartbeat -- but keep in mind that Iíve never tried the Surface Pro, so have no basis for comparison.

LindaR.

Jamie:
I did the same comparison not too long ago. Personally I actually liked the feel of the surface better, because it has a more textured feel (especially if you're using the stylus meant to give you a textured feel.) The apple pencil felt like it was gliding across the glass. Which if you want that, that's fine. I also liked the surface better because it gave you a broader freedom of software. Most software made for the iPad are not going to give you all the features of say the full version of illustrator that you could have on the surface pro.

I ended up going with neither, and bought the Wacom Companion instead. It's significantly more expensive, and heavier/bigger, but it's got more of the power of a laptop than either of the previous two. The digitizer in it is considered the best of the best, wacom produces the hardware that most professional digital artists work on.

But I wanted more for drawing than calligraphy, and I'd had wacom hardware in the past that I was replacing with this purchase, so that's a lot of why I went for that and not one of the other two. Likely one of those is better for digital calligraphy on the go, but I wanted to add in my whole experience. :)

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