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The mysterious blue lines

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Trazo:
This may be a stupid question, but it keep me intrigued. All the methods of business writing take the space between two (blue) lines of the paper as a unity of measure, but I don't have a clue about the standard distance between lines in the paper of that period in the US. If anybody could help me with this, I would have a better idea of the desired size of the letters and the movement exercises. Thanks.

D B Holtz:
Narrow-ruled spacing is 1/4 inch, college-ruled is 9/32, and wide-ruled is 11/32.

HTH,
DB

Trazo:
Well, thank you for such a precise answer, but I am at the same point, as I don't know which of these measures do the old methods refer to.

Erica McPhee:
Such a good point! Thank you DB for the details!

I will see if I can find any photos of said paper and see if I can figure it out. Or perhaps @Masgrimes knows the answer.  ;D

Masgrimes:
"All the methods of business writing take the space between two (blue) lines of the paper as a unity of measure"

All?  Or are we specifically talking about "Modern Business Penmanship"?  There are hundreds of business penmanship books. Maybe you're talking about lessons from a periodical? Writing papers were often furnished with different rulings.

For example:

Zaner-Bloser Penmanship Paper #4 was ruled with “Universal Ruling”, the lines being seven-sixteenths of an inch apart, and was used in grades 3, 4, and upper grades if desired.

Zanerian 5 Lb paper was suited for fine penmanship, correspondence, etc. the lines being three-eighths inch apart.

Zanerian 6 Lb  paper came in both 3/8” and 1/2” ruling. Uses match those above. The ream was 1 Lb heavier.

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