Author Topic: Ladies' Hand  (Read 154 times)

Offline Ken Fraser

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Ladies' Hand
« on: July 20, 2022, 04:06:08 AM »
This is written with a Hunt 101 nib in the Copperplate style, known (for some strange reason), as Ladies' Hand.


Offline Erica McPhee

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Re: Ladies' Hand
« Reply #1 on: July 20, 2022, 07:36:14 PM »
Ken, of all the amazing pieces you have shared with us, I think this is the best. Incredible work!  :-*
Truly, Erica
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Offline Ken Fraser

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Re: Ladies' Hand
« Reply #2 on: July 21, 2022, 03:51:55 AM »
Ken, of all the amazing pieces you have shared with us, I think this is the best. Incredible work!  :-*
Thank you, Erica.
This script was devised c1900 as a form of Spencerian Script, but it can be applied, as here, just as easily to English Roundhand. I wrote this from memory as I've mislaid my original exemplar but I remember seeing this named "Ladies Hand" around 30 years ago.
 
This was the the end result of many attempts.

This is written at an x height of 5mm. Any larger and the extended strokes are beyond me!
« Last Edit: July 21, 2022, 04:12:23 AM by Ken Fraser »

Offline AnasaziWrites

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Re: Ladies' Hand
« Reply #3 on: July 24, 2022, 05:20:51 PM »
Ken, of all the amazing pieces you have shared with us, I think this is the best. Incredible work!  :-*
Thank you, Erica.
This script was devised c1900 as a form of Spencerian Script, but it can be applied, as here, just as easily to English Roundhand. I wrote this from memory as I've mislaid my original exemplar but I remember seeing this named "Ladies Hand" around 30 years ago.
 
This was the the end result of many attempts.

This is written at an x height of 5mm. Any larger and the extended strokes are beyond me!
Beautifully done, @Ken Fraser . Truly lovely.
Earlier examples of Spencerian Ladies hand are in P. R. Spencer's Spencerian Penmanship, Book 13, 1857,,
including Ladies Italian (made with flourishing strokes), Ladies Epistolary, Ladies Capitals, and undoubtedly are in the twelve lessons that precede this book. I'll have to research earlier works to find earlier examples from Spencer.