General Categories > Spencerian Script

Marking guidelines/baselines on "finished products" - how, and with what?

(1/4) > >>

Zivio:
Michael Sull, in the tradition of Spencerian instructors, had sent me a personal nameplate and jotted off a beautifully flourished handwritten note when Id purchased some materials from him last year.  Id noticed a faint baseline in the nameplate, but now noticed baselines in the note only after taking a picture, they were so invisible to my naked eye!

Im eager to begin addressing the stash of postcards Ive accumulated once Ive come to the place of feeling more confident in my writing.
 
Questions about those baselines:

* What do people use to make those fine and inconspicuous lines?
* Do many calligraphers/penhumans make use of such in finished products?
* Is it cheating?  Haha, crow forbid Id accuse a master penman of this, but Im curious about the practice. Postcards and other greeting cards dont lend themselves to use of a lightbox, but should I be working towards nice horizontal baselines without use of a crutch?  My goal is to effect beautiful handwriting for regular correspondence, and it appears that historical examples of such do not make use of these guides.
Thank!
Karl

AnasaziWrites:

--- Quote from: Zivio on December 12, 2021, 06:16:44 PM ---Michael Sull, in the tradition of Spencerian instructors, had sent me a personal nameplate and jotted off a beautifully flourished handwritten note when Id purchased some materials from him last year.  Id noticed a faint baseline in the nameplate, but now noticed baselines in the note only after taking a picture, they were so invisible to my naked eye!

Im eager to begin addressing the stash of postcards Ive accumulated once Ive come to the place of feeling more confident in my writing.
 
Questions about those baselines:

* What do people use to make those fine and inconspicuous lines?
* Do many calligraphers/penhumans make use of such in finished products?
* Is it cheating?  Haha, crow forbid Id accuse a master penman of this, but Im curious about the practice. Postcards and other greeting cards dont lend themselves to use of a lightbox, but should I be working towards nice horizontal baselines without use of a crutch?  My goal is to effect beautiful handwriting for regular correspondence, and it appears that historical examples of such do not make use of these guides.
Thank!
Karl

--- End quote ---
Not cheating at all. Calligraphers/scribes have been using lines for centuries.
The simplest way to make them is to draw them lightly in pencil and then erase them after writing in ink.
One can also use a laser level of opaque items, as per this post
https://theflourishforum.com/forum/index.php?topic=3890.msg54210#msg54210

Erica McPhee:
YES! Guidelines are a must for me. Yes a light pencil like a 2H to 6H. But be aware they may cause indentation on the paper. Use a very light hand. Or a fine mechanical pencil like a 0.5.

I like the charm of seeing the guidelines.  ;)

K-2:
@Zivio - not only not "cheating" but as @AnasaziWrites notes, but the guidelines were very much part of the overall aesthetic of a finished piece in the middle ages.  At some points in paleographic history, people paid more if they could see the lines (it was considered a mark of quality).

And guidelines aren't just for calligraphy - as you've been popping in on Inktober and Invent, I'd like to note that those drawings use a ton of "guidelines" too.  I probably spend as much or even more time creating the "underdrawing" (a sometimes quite elaborate pencil drawing that includes guidelines for negative space highlights as well as for structural shapes and contours) as I do in inking the image.  In fact, sometimes I do these images on tracing paper, so that I can set them underneath watercolor paper on a light table and not have to erase afterward.  It also gives me a fast starting point, if I need to start over again or try out other variations in color, style, or media.

And really, when I lay out calligraphy pieces, I spend way way more time working out the guidelines than inking the actual letters.  It's why when I take commissions, I always charge a "set up & design" fee.

--yours, K

Zivio:
@AnasaziWrites
@Erica McPhee
@K-2

Outstanding, all! Interesting and informative information. Thinking I'll be giving that laser level a shot (thanks for the Forum link on that) although it may denigrate the "charm" and monetary value of my work.  ;D ;D

Wishing you all charming and valuable life moments,

Karl

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

Go to full version