Author Topic: Inktober 2022  (Read 483 times)

Offline K-2

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Inktober 2022
« on: September 01, 2022, 06:56:57 PM »
Flourishers - the Inktober 2022 prompt list dropped today.  Who will step up for Flourish Forum's second annual go at Inktober?

Some of you may remember last year's festivities.  @AnasaziWrites and I both did every single prompt!  A few others joined in for a few prompts/days here and there as well, including Her Leastest Highness of the Flourishers, @Erica McPhee

It was exhilarating!  You can visit what we did:
https://theflourishforum.com/forum/index.php?topic=7256.0

It would be a great place to practice Italics, @Lyric
It would be a great place to practice those beautiful decorated versals with a short text, @Lucie Y
How about join us this year to practice your Spencerian? since you followed along last year, and were so generous in your encouragement for us, @Zivio

Here's what it's all about: https://inktober.com/rules
In short....
1. Starting on 1 October, ink something (you can use your preferred calligraphic style, or a mix of whatever moves you).  I'll probably also do an ink drawing for every prompt (since Inktober started out in the drawing & graphics world)
2. Post it in this thread so we can admire (one of the most fun things about Inktober is seeing the different interpretations of the prompts)
3. Repeat until the end of the month or as often/seldom as you like.  It's not like there are Inktober police who will come and admonish you for doing Inktober "wrong"  ;)

--yours truly, K



Offline Erica McPhee

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Re: Inktober 2022
« Reply #1 on: September 01, 2022, 07:34:15 PM »
Oh this looks fun! Some great words. I’m going to do my best to try to participate.  :-*
Truly, Erica
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Offline Lucie Y

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Re: Inktober 2022
« Reply #2 on: September 02, 2022, 04:18:26 AM »
OMG yes! I'm looking forward!
Thank you for the prompt :)
Looking forward very, very much!
Oh crêpe!

Offline Lyric

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Re: Inktober 2022
« Reply #3 on: September 02, 2022, 06:20:08 AM »
I may switch to uncial.   Our friend here, Jean Wilson, stated it might be easier for me to pick up.
Cheerfully,
Lyric

Online tiffany.c.a

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Re: Inktober 2022
« Reply #4 on: September 20, 2022, 05:47:27 PM »
I think I’ll try to participate! Just refreshed my memory about how to post photos…
Now I just need the motivation and discipline to do at least some days.
Looking forward to seeing other participants’ work.

Offline K-2

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Re: Inktober 2022
« Reply #5 on: September 22, 2022, 11:12:28 PM »
Dear Inktoberists - @Erica McPhee @AnasaziWrites @tiffany.c.a @Lucie Y @Lyric @Zivio
(anyone else?  I hope others join in too!)

With Inktober just about a week away, I thought I'd talk about some of my strategies for getting through an ink a day, every day.  It's a lot!

First off, I want to reassure everyone that there are no Inktober police who will scold you for any reason.  You don't have to do every prompt!  Just do one a week, or only the ones you really like, or only the days you have extra time, or heck, start early!

The point of the list is to constrain your choices and focus your creativity.  Also to make it fun for us to compare how we interpreted the prompts.  I love using the prompts - I find that they remove the question of "WHAT should I ink??"  And turn it a question of "HOW should I ink?"  (see, it helps remove the chores of being "creative" and having "ideas"). But you know, if it's not your jam, just do your own thing.  That's okay too.  The main goal of Inktober is to try to ink more often.

I want to put it out here that I have a full time job.  And it's a super busy job.  I put in a 12.5 hour work-day yesterday.  And I have a research agenda (I'm writing a book!).  And I have an art & calligraphy side-hustle.  I also have a family, with a teen still at home.  And I'm active in my community.  So yeah.  I know - it's hard to "find time".... but...

I like to think of it as making time for it, because I know it's going to up my skill level (and because it's fun, and I like to make time to have fun).  Seriously though, I make some of my biggest skills gains during Inktober and Inkvent every year, because it forces me to practice in a low-stakes environment.  I mean, really practice, because just working on the things I do professionally can make me a little stagnant, perhaps even a little risk-averse.  Also, people pay me to make things that I am good at making.  But practice means I make things that I am not good at, and thereby get better, sometimes even good!  And I'm displaying the "not as good" practice work - I hope that encourages others who are practicing too.

So how do I get through the 31-Day slog?

Strategy 1: Start Early!  Seriously - they give us the list a month in advance.  Just start inking right away, and then if you miss a day or two or more, you can catch up.

Strategy 2: (if starting early feels like "cheating" even though it's not cheating)  Make the decisions early.  Draft the layout, choose the ink(s), make under-drawings (if you're doing drawings), pick the passages if you're doing text, draw the guidelines for the text.  Whatever you need to get a head start.  Then start applying the ink on 1 Oct.

Strategy 3: Pick a theme.  Further limiting your options for how you will respond to the prompt can help you too.  For example - last "Inkvent" I decided to show all the inks in portraits of famous people (taking the name of the ink as the prompt).  This Inktober, I'm going to do drawings of animals/birds/bugs for all the prompts; and I'm going to practice copperplate too.

Strategy 4: Pick an ink.  Last Inktober, I drew all the pictures in monochrome - one ink per drawing.  Not mixing colors makes drawing quicker.  I also made the pictures kind of small (postcard size).  For calligraphy, you can just stick to one ink - maybe a favorite? maybe a new one? maybe use an ink you're trying to use up because you want to have a reason to buy the Inkvent 2022 set?

And/Or use a combination of strategies!
Photo: Inktober list w/ideas, in messy handwriting, under-drawing of a red junglefowl for day 16 prompt

Looking forward to seeing your ink!
--yours truly, K

Offline Erica McPhee

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Re: Inktober 2022
« Reply #6 on: September 23, 2022, 09:09:57 AM »
This was so helpful! Thank you! I am really looking forward to seeing your Inktobers!  :-* P.S. I have a teen at home, too! And a 21 yo who may never leave.  ;D
Truly, Erica
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Offline Lucie Y

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Re: Inktober 2022
« Reply #7 on: September 24, 2022, 04:28:02 AM »
Darn, I've been holding back from starting Inktober early, didn't want to party poop the spirit out of Inktober. (I do not yet know the unspoken rules of this community   ;D ;D  ;D So much for that, I started practicing Gargoyle yesterday 😁
I'm thinking of ways to make the most of Inktober. My interests are to improve my Copperplate and to develop the Ronde that I just started to learn. So I will probably switch back and forth.
As for versals, I do believe I will practice them separately, because of I take the time to build one, ink it, and choose  a color palette, I am hoping to turn it into something I can give, like someone's baby name.  And "Scallop" is not a popular name in my neighborhood  ;D
Oh crêpe!

Offline K-2

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Re: Inktober 2022
« Reply #8 on: September 24, 2022, 02:08:28 PM »
Hey, @Lucie Y - A bit of encouragement and advice for your particular goals.
* And I want to preface these remarks by saying that everyone should do what makes them happy and feel good, but getting better at stuff usually involves a little unhappiness.
* Lucie, your work is already highly accomplished, and you seem to want to level up.  So as a professional and as a teacher - this is my take on how make the most of Inktober.

Inktober is a great time to make things that you don't intend to sell or give away.
Inktober is a celebration of mediocrity and mishap!  Let it be "mid" (as my teens say - one of whom has successfully struck off on his own now, @Erica McPhee - it'll happen for you too, eventually!)

A little pedantry & pedagogy ahead:

I promise that making less successful or even outright unsuccessful pieces is never a waste.  You'll always learn something from the process.  I make a living as a professional scholar, artist and calligrapher, and less than 20% of the ink or paint I put to paper ever gets to prime time.  I write 10 pages of prose to come up with 2 good ones.  I fill my notebooks with sketches and practice runs of different types of decorated capitals.  Before I start a final presentation piece, I draft full-text tests of the script to determine size and layout; and then I do complete, full-scale layouts of commissions (sometimes two or three versions).  I make monochrome ink sketches and elaborate under-drawings before doing full-sized watercolor paintings.

Medieval scribes called this type of work "foul papers" or "foul copy" - and they threw most of it away, but we know about it, because they talked a lot about what it took to prepare a "fair copy" or a "presentation copy" of a manuscript.  So -- as a calligraphers, you know, let's not think that we're better than Matthew Paris or Adam Pinkhurst or Jeanne de Montbaston, and can go straight to "fair copy" without the foul.

If you give yourself over to the raw task of putting a lot of ink on paper, you'll really grow.  Last Inktober, we had a discussion of getting out of our comfort zones (Thank you, @AnasaziWrites and @Zivio ).  I'm always telling my students that if they're not failing from time to time, they're not trying hard enough.  One of my art teachers impressed it upon me that you never get to paint a masterpiece unless you've also painted rooms and rooms full of less than masterful work (it's how you might eventually achieve that mastery).

I'm going to suggest that if you sketch out a versal every day without worrying about being able to "use" it for something - and then pair it with a text (ronde or copperplate or italic or whatever), you'll see the following happen:

1. You'll get bored with your (very beautiful and very accomplished) vine and flower designs, and you'll experiment with other types of decoration.  Some of them will look bad.  That's okay!  Some of them will surprise you with their beauty and with their potential - and they'll give you something to follow up with later.
* Remember that "ideas" sheet I posted to your thread about them?  I drew those with a gel pen and colored pencils - they don't have to be precious; it's enough to give an idea.  You don't have to give every one of the the full treatment!
* And therefore you'll end up with a larger repertoire of designs to draw from for your "presentation" pieces later.

2. You'll experiment with the relationship between the versal and the text - spacing, sizing, style, etc.  Again - some will look better than others.  Think about what makes some look better than others - you'll start to develop a theory about it.

3. You'll develop an instinct (or at least a written record) for what's going to work with regard to style/design/script.  Which will make future projects faster, easier, and more polished.  In other words, you'll get from "foul" to "fair" quicker, and the "fair" will be fairer.

/pedagogy.

*******
My particular goals this Inktober: exploring my ink collection for art purposes; practicing my copperplate.  Usually when I paint a commission, I use watercolors because they are stable and predictable pigment-based media.  Dye-based fountain pen inks can be wild-cards.  They often have astounding properties: chromatography, duo-tones, sheen, shimmer, and chemical reactivity to bleach and to other inks.  You never know what's going to happen when you mix them with each other - sometimes they actually repel each other; sometimes they just seize up into a gel.  But they also have different layering and lifting properties, so I'll be testing those too.  I expect some ink drawings will not go well!  But at the end of the month, I'm going to know a lot more about how I can use particular inks and combinations of inks for art purposes as well as calligraphy.  And knowing which ones don't work is also important!

And you know - I hardly ever do presentation work with copperplate.  But if it were better, I'd have another option.

--yours truly, K

PS: Remember this "fail" from last Inkvent? - the ink is "Ruby Blues"; the drawing is of Ruby Bridges. It is not what I was hoping for, I still think it looks terrible, but I now know lots of things about what this ink will and won't do, which is very valuable.  I eventually got over the shame, so I'm showing it here again as an object lesson in getting over myself.

Offline Lucie Y

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Re: Inktober 2022
« Reply #9 on: September 24, 2022, 05:21:50 PM »
Hey, @Lucie Y - A bit of encouragement and advice for your particular goals.
* And I want to preface these remarks by saying that everyone should do what makes them happy and feel good, but getting better at stuff usually involves a little unhappiness.
* Lucie, your work is already highly accomplished, and you seem to want to level up.  So as a professional and as a teacher - this is my take on how make the most of Inktober.

Inktober is a great time to make things that you don't intend to sell or give away.
Inktober is a celebration of mediocrity and mishap!  Let it be "mid" (as my teens say - one of whom has successfully struck off on his own now, @Erica McPhee - it'll happen for you too, eventually!)

A little pedantry & pedagogy ahead:

I promise that making less successful or even outright unsuccessful pieces is never a waste.  You'll always learn something from the process.  I make a living as a professional scholar, artist and calligrapher, and less than 20% of the ink or paint I put to paper ever gets to prime time.  I write 10 pages of prose to come up with 2 good ones.  I fill my notebooks with sketches and practice runs of different types of decorated capitals.  Before I start a final presentation piece, I draft full-text tests of the script to determine size and layout; and then I do complete, full-scale layouts of commissions (sometimes two or three versions).  I make monochrome ink sketches and elaborate under-drawings before doing full-sized watercolor paintings.

Medieval scribes called this type of work "foul papers" or "foul copy" - and they threw most of it away, but we know about it, because they talked a lot about what it took to prepare a "fair copy" or a "presentation copy" of a manuscript.  So -- as a calligraphers, you know, let's not think that we're better than Matthew Paris or Adam Pinkhurst or Jeanne de Montbaston, and can go straight to "fair copy" without the foul.

If you give yourself over to the raw task of putting a lot of ink on paper, you'll really grow.  Last Inktober, we had a discussion of getting out of our comfort zones (Thank you, @AnasaziWrites and @Zivio ).  I'm always telling my students that if they're not failing from time to time, they're not trying hard enough.  One of my art teachers impressed it upon me that you never get to paint a masterpiece unless you've also painted rooms and rooms full of less than masterful work (it's how you might eventually achieve that mastery).

I'm going to suggest that if you sketch out a versal every day without worrying about being able to "use" it for something - and then pair it with a text (ronde or copperplate or italic or whatever), you'll see the following happen:

1. You'll get bored with your (very beautiful and very accomplished) vine and flower designs, and you'll experiment with other types of decoration.  Some of them will look bad.  That's okay!  Some of them will surprise you with their beauty and with their potential - and they'll give you something to follow up with later.
* Remember that "ideas" sheet I posted to your thread about them?  I drew those with a gel pen and colored pencils - they don't have to be precious; it's enough to give an idea.  You don't have to give every one of the the full treatment!
* And therefore you'll end up with a larger repertoire of designs to draw from for your "presentation" pieces later.

2. You'll experiment with the relationship between the versal and the text - spacing, sizing, style, etc.  Again - some will look better than others.  Think about what makes some look better than others - you'll start to develop a theory about it.

3. You'll develop an instinct (or at least a written record) for what's going to work with regard to style/design/script.  Which will make future projects faster, easier, and more polished.  In other words, you'll get from "foul" to "fair" quicker, and the "fair" will be fairer.

/pedagogy.

*******
My particular goals this Inktober: exploring my ink collection for art purposes; practicing my copperplate.  Usually when I paint a commission, I use watercolors because they are stable and predictable pigment-based media.  Dye-based fountain pen inks can be wild-cards.  They often have astounding properties: chromatography, duo-tones, sheen, shimmer, and chemical reactivity to bleach and to other inks.  You never know what's going to happen when you mix them with each other - sometimes they actually repel each other; sometimes they just seize up into a gel.  But they also have different layering and lifting properties, so I'll be testing those too.  I expect some ink drawings will not go well!  But at the end of the month, I'm going to know a lot more about how I can use particular inks and combinations of inks for art purposes as well as calligraphy.  And knowing which ones don't work is also important!

And you know - I hardly ever do presentation work with copperplate.  But if it were better, I'd have another option.

--yours truly, K

PS: Remember this "fail" from last Inkvent? - the ink is "Ruby Blues"; the drawing is of Ruby Bridges. It is not what I was hoping for, I still think it looks terrible, but I now know lots of things about what this ink will and won't do, which is very valuable.  I eventually got over the shame, so I'm showing it here again as an object lesson in getting over myself.

Hi K-2!
First of all, thank you for your detailed response, it will help me meditate on how I want to make the most of Inktober.

I want to clarify one thing: my reason for not doing (or doing fewer) versals this period is not only because it is a long process, but also because it is an easy process. After a few more tries following my last post, I was pretty confident with generating the shape. You see, Tri Le's manual for versals is a gem, it gives you the exact measures, and then you tweak the final letter to your liking. It is a calm and meditative process, time-consuming, but not difficult. So yes, if I want to take a lot of time to make a pretty but not difficult thing, I'd rather it go to someone as gift.

But I don't mind at all working long and hard on the difficult elements, even though they will sit forever in my practice journal (and I like them there!).

Now what I desperately want to improve on:
- for the versals: the ornamentation that goes around it. The letter shapes are easy but I am working hard on everything that goes with it. So, during Inktober, expect little vines and flowers and birdies (and gilding). I also want to perfect my color combinations.
- for the actual calligraphy: the capitals!!! I always neglect them. So the Inktober prompts are perfect for practicing random capitals. I don't want to miss out on that.

You are absolutely right about the benefits of still doing the versals to test how it articulates with script and x-height, and for this I will probably do simple sketches of versals on several prompts, and focus on making it work with the scripts.

By the way, I want you to know, I have referred back to your sketches several times as it has been greatly encouraging and inspiring to me  :)

As the mom of an adorable fireball of a toddler, I also try to make the most of every opportunity to practice, these days 1-3 hours a day (hurray for being a very late night owl, and thankfully work isn't too early in the morning). I am working hard to level up as it is my priority at the moment. Thus, I am taking all the advice I can get!

Below are little bits of what I've been working on these days, humble tidbits but they are the roadblocks to where I want to go. And they make me smile  :)

I look forward to seeing everyone's prompts!

P.S. I love that drawing of yours! But only we know for ourselves what is our good work, and what isn't :)
Oh crêpe!

Offline K-2

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Re: Inktober 2022
« Reply #10 on: September 24, 2022, 05:59:18 PM »
So much delight in those birds, @Lucie Y -- I'm working on birds myself for a summer project I have in mind to draw all the birds that I've seen in my yard.

So you're right on with the notion of practicing the harder elements - to make it quicker, don't bother doing the measuring for the versals.  I bet you can intuit the right proportions now.  When I'm working on ideas for those, I often use colored markers and gel pens to get the shape of them down so that I can noodle around with decorative elements.  I wonder if you can step aside from the vine and flowers and see if you can decorate with say... a shell motif?  Probably, as you say, there aren't any kids named "Scallop" in your orbit, but maybe there's a "Shelly"?

Those Inktober prompts are PROMPTS.  You can reference them as literally or figuratively as you like.

And you're right about practicing the other capitals too - with Ronde and Italic, you have a LOT of flexibility.  I've been working on different sets of flourished Italic capitals myself, in preparation for a piece that I need to deliver in February.

Gosh your copperplate is very beautiful too.  I can't wait to see your Inktober work!  It's going to be a great month!
-- yours, K

(I'll admit to have been blessed with a spouse that did a lot of the really hard parenting when the boys were toddlers, so that I could keep focusing on building my career.  I like to think I made it up when the hockey started, doing a lot of overtime as a hockey parent.  But who am I kidding.  Toddlers just demand so much more attention and energy.  May you find some relaxation and restoration in your art, @Lucie Y )

Offline Lucie Y

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Re: Inktober 2022
« Reply #11 on: September 24, 2022, 06:30:10 PM »
I'm very curious to see your birds @K-2 !

It hadn't even crossed my mind to build simple versals without 40mn of planning. Writing them offhand opens up a bunch of possibilities.
This gives me a lot of ideas, because you see, the first word is Gargoyle, and Gargoyle = Notre Dame de Paris, and I live in Paris. I wonder if I could do a versal with something that evoques Notre Dame. Maybe I'm going to spend the whole month of October writing "Gargoyle" now haha.

Some really cool ideas you have there, thank you for your time and generosity.

I look forward to Inktober!

P.S. congratulations on being a hockey parent, lucky kids!
P.P.S.  copperplate always looks better when photographed at a slant angle O:)
Oh crêpe!

Offline Zivio

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Re: Inktober 2022
« Reply #12 on: September 24, 2022, 08:19:25 PM »
A little pedantry & pedagogy ahead ...

Pedantry, pedagogy … and persuasion!
 
It was my pleasure to read this thoughtful post – as well as having been the beneficiary of your kind words of encouragement via direct message.  Truthfully, I’d been thinking a lot about my resistance to participating in Inktober over the weeks since that note.  And I’ve learned so many fascinating things about various scripts, history of writing and many other things from your many offerings on FF, and really wanted to cheer you in return by supporting this “event.”

The Inner Game of Tennis was published in 1974. The author wrote, “Every game is composed of two parts, an outer game and an inner game. The former is played against opponents, and is filled with lots of contradictory advice; the latter is played not against, but within the mind of the player, and its principal obstacles are self-doubt and anxiety.” And so it has been for me with the inner game of the writing arts.  Besides the technical challenges and questions answered for me on this forum, I’ve benefitted from members of this community by their supportive comments addressing that game in the head.  And I've learned that feelings about the quality of our personal work is shared by all of us.
 
But it has been encounters with others’ “foul copy” presented on various online platforms that has recently been so helpful!  My first reaction to the beautiful work I’d seen on this forum was having been daunted by how far I’ve yet to go. I’m finally seeing that this is the journey that everyone takes … it’s only that others may have been on it for years and potentially thousands of hours more.  I admire and am inspired by the humblest of efforts – inspired by the efforts that have gone into it.  And continue to be appreciative of the really fine finished products – inspired by the hard work and perseverance that made them possible at all.

I’ve gotten so much from FF without feeling like having had much to offer back.  If my "humble copy" may help other beginners like myself feel good about progress, than this is something of value!

PERSONAL GOALS:

I’ve taken on the study of Spencerian script to improve my handwriting for thoughtful correspondence with acquaintances and loved ones.  While I yearn to make it as beautiful as possible, calligraphic art (presentation work?) per se, is not where I see myself heading.  So, you likely will see from me the daily (I hope) words simply written in Spencerian – no special art, or wit.  ;D   But I do have a couple of ideas where Inktober might challenge me to try new things.   I had purchased a stock of vintage postcards that I’d hoped would be a fun way to send short notes, but soon found that the quality and variety of papers don’t consistently work with pointed pen. I bought a bunch of brush pens and some ballpoints but just haven’t learned how to use them.  Maybe my challenge will be to test out some of these new tools.  I’ve also just begun to learn some of the more ornamental penmanship style of majuscules.  Inktober could be a good way to press forward with these.

~Karl

PS:  Apparently, the first rule of Inktober Club is, "There are no rules for Inktober Club."
« Last Edit: September 24, 2022, 08:24:46 PM by Zivio »
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Online tiffany.c.a

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Re: Inktober 2022
« Reply #13 on: September 25, 2022, 10:09:00 PM »
I looked through the 2021 Inktober thread. Wow, you all did amazing.
Whether people have specific goals or will just be playing or going with the flow, it’s all good.
My goal? Simply to sit my behind down at my art table and use some ink.  :)
So excited…

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Re: Inktober 2022
« Reply #14 on: September 25, 2022, 10:45:42 PM »
As a complete opposite to my above-mentioned approach…
Someone on another art forum offered these steps to help us think about our Inktober goals/planning. You may have heard of the acronym SMART for achieving goals. Summarized, it’s as follows:

Specific: make sure goal is well-defined, simple is OK
Measurable: set quantifiable way to measure progress
Achievable: choose attainable goal, consider realities
Relevant: align goals with what’s important to you
Time-based: set deadline(s) for reaching your goal

I suppose the deadline would be already set as Oct. 31.
But all else perhaps can be tailored for you.
May be useful in other areas of life too.

« Last Edit: September 25, 2022, 10:48:27 PM by tiffany.c.a »