Author Topic: Drawing with nib  (Read 4450 times)

Offline Ryumaou

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Drawing with nib
« on: October 06, 2017, 05:48:40 AM »
Here are my holders:

These are the nibs in the holders I use now 25. December 2017, Esterbrook 62 Crowquill, Zebra Maru A (hard) Crowquill, Vintage Hunt 100 and Presbitero 500 EF:


Tachikawa T-25 (Brause Rose: a tiny piece of paper supports the nib), 5.6 mm Mechanical graphite pen (Brause Rose: The grip is pretty strong and it almost appears to have a small impact on decreased ink flow), european nib holder sawed off (Blanzy Pour & Cie Ouest 86)


Brause Rose (left; for fine lines I use the upper side of the nib) Blanzy Pour & Cie Ouest 86 (right; the written words are done with this nib. When applying pressure, the ink flow became too fast :) )
I will receive some other nibs and do example drawings for them soon.
DIN A4 medium grain paper


Brause Rose DIN A4, medium grain paper

http://www.bilder-upload.eu/upload/816a34-1507283476.jpg

Brause Rose DIN A3, smooth paper
« Last Edit: December 25, 2017, 07:28:58 AM by Ryumaou »

Offline AnasaziWrites

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Re: Drawing with nib
« Reply #1 on: October 06, 2017, 09:23:39 AM »
Nice drawings.
What paper has given you the finest lines?

Offline Ryumaou

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Re: Drawing with nib
« Reply #2 on: October 06, 2017, 10:44:08 AM »
Thank you for your compliment.

I have difficulties answering your question but I used these 2 papers:
Daler Rowney Sketchbook, 100 gr/m² with medium grain
Sketch Pad Ref. No. 10 628 911, 185 g/m² even surface

The first has slightly more loose paper structure and the nibs are easier to gather cellulose when I draw over soaked in ink areas.
The second has barely any grain at all.

If I was looking for the finest lines I would place my bet on thick structured paper with low to medium grain.

The stiff Blanzy Pour Cie Ouest 86 ''eats'' the paper when it is soaked in ink a bit more than the softer Brause Rose.

http://www.bilder-upload.eu/upload/ae12a5-1507300872.jpg

Offline JanisTX

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Re: Drawing with nib
« Reply #3 on: October 07, 2017, 12:58:18 PM »
Beautiful work!

Janis

Offline Ryumaou

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Re: Drawing with nib
« Reply #4 on: October 08, 2017, 09:58:12 AM »
Thank you for your compliment.

I can do evenly strong lines easier the further to the tip I hold the pen. I have the dominant (my middle finger) on the nib itself and suddenly it becomes easier.

I have a 10 year old Leonardt/Hiro 6H (I put it in a wooden blank ''Standardgraph''). It was covered in an that old layer of ink and after cleaning it it is fine.

It is DIN A3 smooth paper and I want another side by side:

http://www.bilder-upload.eu/show.php?file=284c86-1507471058.jpg

http://www.bilder-upload.eu/upload/e18f4a-1507483094.jpg
« Last Edit: October 08, 2017, 01:19:10 PM by Ryumaou »

Offline Ryumaou

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Re: Drawing with nib
« Reply #5 on: October 09, 2017, 09:15:51 AM »
I include 3 new nibs into this drawing. I barely tested them so far:

1. Heintze & Blanckertz, No. 2280 E, Typ 1
2. Mathias Salcher & Söhne, No. 224 EF (pro: flat holding allows for extremely broad strokes)
3. Carl Kuhn & Co No. 155 EF, weiss, J. Klaps Feder

6 different nibs are ''hidden'' in this:

http://www.bilder-upload.eu/upload/0299a5-1507552980.jpg

From left to right:
Leonardt/Hiro 6H
Mathias Salcher & Söhne
Blanzy Poure (center)
Brause Rose (down middle)
Heintze (down right)
Carl Kuhn (up right)

Offline Ryumaou

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Re: Drawing with nib
« Reply #6 on: October 09, 2017, 01:15:59 PM »
Mathias Salcher & Söhne 224 EF on medium grain paper:
« Last Edit: November 20, 2017, 03:21:43 PM by Ryumaou »

Offline schin

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Re: Drawing with nib
« Reply #7 on: October 09, 2017, 02:18:40 PM »
Beautiful work! Perfect for Inktober.
OPENINKSTAND // website | blog |instagramyoutube

Offline Ryumaou

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Re: Drawing with nib
« Reply #8 on: October 09, 2017, 02:26:55 PM »
Thank you for complimenting my drawings.

Comparison to the Brause Rose.
The fine lines are only possible for me when using the upper side of the BR.

The Mathias Salcher allows the same quite well.

When replicating the flat holding with the Brause Rose the outer side of the nib start touching the paper at low angle.
The stroke is less broad than the MS.
« Last Edit: November 20, 2017, 03:21:16 PM by Ryumaou »

Offline Ryumaou

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Re: Drawing with nib
« Reply #9 on: October 10, 2017, 02:31:15 PM »
Moved downwards.
« Last Edit: November 20, 2017, 03:20:35 PM by Ryumaou »

Offline Ryumaou

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Re: Drawing with nib
« Reply #10 on: October 12, 2017, 12:49:37 PM »
Moved downwards.
« Last Edit: November 20, 2017, 03:17:43 PM by Ryumaou »

Offline Ryumaou

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Re: Drawing with nib
« Reply #11 on: October 17, 2017, 08:54:19 AM »
DIN A3 size with Mathias Salcher and Presbitero 500 EF


DIN A5 Presbitero 500 EF
« Last Edit: November 20, 2017, 03:20:02 PM by Ryumaou »

Offline evjo

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Re: Drawing with nib
« Reply #12 on: October 26, 2017, 08:58:44 PM »
Love your drawings!  Drawing with a pointed pen is what led me to find the pointed pen calligraphers.  I haven't done much of either lately (unfortunately) but your work is an inspiration. 
Here is a page from my sketchbook.
Ev

Offline Ryumaou

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Re: Drawing with nib
« Reply #13 on: October 28, 2017, 08:13:57 AM »
Presbitero 500 EF (''big'' EF beak nib) held at low angle for large strokes or steep for fine lines.

4x DIN A5

A5

A5

A5

A bit of brush aswell. A5

A4


A5 Esterbrook 62 Crowquill + Presbitero 500 EF Beaknib

Esterbrook 62 Crowquill

DIN A5 Esterbrook 62 + a bit Zebra Maru A
I bent one Esterbrook 62 when catching the paper on a quick sideways and upward line. ''It is too delicate for my unplanned quickshooting'' Few lines are done with Zebra Maru A and it is finer and more stiff.

Zebra Maru 2586 A - Hard Nib on DIN A4 size medium textured paper (the nib is perfect for controlled fine lines <- see the hairlines at the top of the image)
« Last Edit: November 21, 2017, 02:49:51 PM by Ryumaou »

Offline Ryumaou

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Re: Drawing with nib
« Reply #14 on: November 23, 2017, 01:04:06 PM »
Zebra Maru A (Hard) 2586 nib + Presbitero 500 EF (shades) on DIN A4 medium grain paper.
It is finer than others making this ideal for details.
High stiffness is good for fast sketching.
I wonder if there is an easier to use fine nib.

Edit about light shadow and form: As I watch an ancient drawing I get the idea to use lines pointing to (to indicate) the light source's location. More direct light will make ''one-directional'' lines on surfaces. Spread lightsources (scattered background reflections) will produce scattered (crosshatching for example) surface lines. It is more work but I think it will be a good description. In black and white Marvel comics they combine full black areas for the darkest shades and one directional lines in the transitional areas between full light and full shadow.
« Last Edit: November 26, 2017, 12:20:46 PM by Ryumaou »