Author Topic: Logo tips  (Read 1824 times)

Offline Despoina

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Logo tips
« on: October 28, 2023, 02:53:46 AM »
Hello everyone!

Did I say I loveee the new Flourish forum logo?? ;D :-*

Watching that awesome logo, I was thinking that may it's time (oh well, around in that year I guess), to start making my own logo for my little calligraphy corner. It may be still in the very beginning, but hey, everyone deserves a good logo right? ::)

What are your tips on logo making? What should I be careful for or pay more attention to?

Thank you in advance  :-*

Offline Erica McPhee

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Re: Logo tips
« Reply #1 on: October 28, 2023, 11:26:21 AM »
Thank you!  :)

Oh this is so exciting! I spent a couple years dedicated to logo designing for a web company. It was one of my favorite things to do. Here are some tips:

1. Start with a list. List out all the adjectives you want your logo to represent. What kind of calligrapher will you be, what niche will you focus on - weddings, graphics, greeting cards, etc. Maybe it’s all of the above, or maybe you know you want to focus on wedding envelopes or what have you. Your logo should speak to your client. For example, I just designed a logo for my new business (which will be announced later). So I wrote:
Whimsical, fresh, modern, fun, sweet, Beatrix Potter vibe, delicate, timeless. My first draft was too “wedding-ish” (and this business is not about weddings at all). So I revamped it and was satisfied with the end result.
2. Begin your drafts with pencil, not a calligraphy pen. Sketch out what you want your design to look like. Try several different quick sketches before starting the artwork. This will save you time in the long run and prevent hours of practicing letters without a design direction.
3. Speaking of design direction - have a trusted friend or another calligrapher who can be honest and help give you art direction. Even the best artists need someone to look at the design with a fresh eye.
4. After you think you are done - put it away for a day or two. Then tape it to a blank wall and step back to look at it. Does it look how you want it? Are there things that jump out at you that you can change?
5. Look at the white space around the design. Is there a shape of the logo that is well proportioned?
6. Don’t be afraid to refresh your logo after a few years. We all continue to grow in our art and will eventually outgrow our logo. I have seen some calligraphers that are doing incredible work but their logo is from 5 years ago and doesn’t reflect their improvements.

I hope that helps!
Warm Regards,
Erica
Lettering & Design Artist
Flourish Forum Shop
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Offline Despoina

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Re: Logo tips
« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2023, 05:17:35 AM »
Thank you!  :)

Oh this is so exciting! I spent a couple years dedicated to logo designing for a web company. It was one of my favorite things to do. Here are some tips:

1. Start with a list. List out all the adjectives you want your logo to represent. What kind of calligrapher will you be, what niche will you focus on - weddings, graphics, greeting cards, etc. Maybe it’s all of the above, or maybe you know you want to focus on wedding envelopes or what have you. Your logo should speak to your client. For example, I just designed a logo for my new business (which will be announced later). So I wrote:
Whimsical, fresh, modern, fun, sweet, Beatrix Potter vibe, delicate, timeless. My first draft was too “wedding-ish” (and this business is not about weddings at all). So I revamped it and was satisfied with the end result.
2. Begin your drafts with pencil, not a calligraphy pen. Sketch out what you want your design to look like. Try several different quick sketches before starting the artwork. This will save you time in the long run and prevent hours of practicing letters without a design direction.
3. Speaking of design direction - have a trusted friend or another calligrapher who can be honest and help give you art direction. Even the best artists need someone to look at the design with a fresh eye.
4. After you think you are done - put it away for a day or two. Then tape it to a blank wall and step back to look at it. Does it look how you want it? Are there things that jump out at you that you can change?
5. Look at the white space around the design. Is there a shape of the logo that is well proportioned?
6. Don’t be afraid to refresh your logo after a few years. We all continue to grow in our art and will eventually outgrow our logo. I have seen some calligraphers that are doing incredible work but their logo is from 5 years ago and doesn’t reflect their improvements.

I hope that helps!

Thank you so much Erica!  :-* Sorry for the late reply, you truly helped a lot! The thing that scares me the most (and prevents me from even starting), is that I will create a "mediocre" logo, that will follow me on my journey. Like, in the bad way. I have heard that the logo is the first, and most important impression, and with that you have to "win" you client. Do you think that's true?

Offline Erica McPhee

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Re: Logo tips
« Reply #3 on: November 05, 2023, 09:55:16 AM »
it is definitely true that your logo will be a representation of your work (and becomes part of your “brand”). However, I will let you in on a little secret - most non-calligraphers cannot discern the difference between levels of calligraphy. There is beauty to be found in all levels of work. So do not let this hold you back.

With that said, I always advise to be sure you are ready to start a business. Ask yourself, am I producing quality work, would I buy my services, am I a capable of seeing a job through from beginning to end and doing it with quality. I am not trying to dissuade you. When I was running my wedding invitation business, I saved many a bride from calligraphers who got in over their head.

The best advice I can give is start slow. Your business should grow organically over time. But we all have to start somewhere! So don’t let the fear of a mediocre logo hold you back. If you’d like, I can help you with feedback when you have a few drafts. (Another tip: do at least 3 different variations and then choose which one you like best to refine.)

P.S. Keep in mind, many artists hire other designers to either design their logo or create one for them (at least they used to many moons ago) because it is sometimes hardest to design for ourselves. That is why feedback is so valuable. It helps remove your personal bias from the process.  :)
Warm Regards,
Erica
Lettering & Design Artist
Flourish Forum Shop
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