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Topics - Masgrimes

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(Cross-posted from Copperplate, Engrosser's Script, Roundhand Calligraphy)

Hey Everyone!

I wanted to share a bit about my online program dedicated to Engrosser's Script. I hope those of you interested in pursuing competency in this style will consider giving it a look!

Before we get started, I do have some need+merit-based scholarships available, so if you're not in a position to support the course but really think you'd get a lot out of it, please send me an email. david@Masgrimes.com

What is Dreaming In Script?

I started developing a curriculum for teaching ES a few years ago when I traveled around the US teaching Engroser's Script in single day workshops. I learned a lot in those classes. Mostly what I learned was that I didn't have a great way to get everything I wanted to talk about packed into an 8-hour class. Some people seemed to get a lot out of those workshops...others might have felt rushed. I knew I wanted to be making something that supported multiple learning styles, so I kept revising and looking for new inspiration in how to teach script.

Over the years, I've come up with a few different methods and models that I think really expand on what Lupfer talks about in the beginning pages of the Zanerian Manual. Regardless of the debate surrounding the differences between copperplate, roundhand, ES, etc. my frame of reference has always been American penmen. I'm interested in how they used their own variation of this centuries-old hand and the style is unique enough that it stands out to me as the most beautiful. I love this script.



https://i.imgur.com/f7NzCew.jpg See that ^ in HD.

So I started developing Dreaming In Script by running a series of 12-week classes at my studio in Hillsboro, Oregon. I tested the full curriculum with six different students privately for twelve weeks. Refined some more, and then set out to make this course.

What does the course look like?

The twelve sections follow a pretty straight-forward and logical progression. I can outline them simply by breaking them into thirds.

1/3: This third of the course focuses on developing a frame of reference for the ensuing practice. You learn about some history, strokes, pen control. We start by setting up expectations and helping to develop an eye for what kind of fidelity you're looking for in your strokes. The students in the course regularly come back to this section after making it through to later areas of the curriculum. It helps to digest these models and ideas several times.

2/3: This second third of the course focuses on developing your understanding of the minuscule forms, which are assembled from things we learn in the first section. We introduce some aspects of stylistic variation. I don't mean flourishing, I mean hunting down specimens of writing from various penmen and adopting big picture styles. There is a lot of variation in historical specimens and you can have a number of different influences that make ES look radically different from one penman to the next.

3/3 This last third of the course focuses on the Majuscule forms, writing, and several small projects. I really wanted to take students through to a point where they feel like they can employ their writing for its utility. The projects at the end are set up as role-play scenarios where you are a penman from the early 20th century, and you're being tasked with a project for a certain reason. Kinda fun!

---

If any of this sounds like something you're interested in, please feel free to head over to Dreaming In Script and take a look. There are a couple of preview lessons available so you can see what they look like. Each lesson tends to have some combination of videos, diagrams, and essays. I include quite a few scans from my personal collection and those are all presented in super high-resolution so that you can get into the details and see what these old penmen were up to while they were setting our generation up for all of the incredible work that we're going to be doing over the next few decades. I get excited just thinking about it!

Here's a link. Thanks for reading!

http://bit.ly/DIS_FF



2
Hey Everyone!

I wanted to share a bit about my online program dedicated to Engrosser's Script. I hope those of you interested in pursuing competency in this style will consider giving it a look!

Before we get started, I do have some need+merit-based scholarships available, so if you're not in a position to support the course but really think you'd get a lot out of it, please send me an email. david@Masgrimes.com

What is Dreaming In Script?

I started developing a curriculum for teaching ES a few years ago when I traveled around the US teaching Engroser's Script in single day workshops. I learned a lot in those classes. Mostly what I learned was that I didn't have a great way to get everything I wanted to talk about packed into an 8-hour class. Some people seemed to get a lot out of those workshops...others might have felt rushed. I knew I wanted to be making something that supported multiple learning styles, so I kept revising and looking for new inspiration in how to teach script.

Over the years, I've come up with a few different methods and models that I think really expand on what Lupfer talks about in the beginning pages of the Zanerian Manual. Regardless of the debate surrounding the differences between copperplate, roundhand, ES, etc. my frame of reference has always been American penmen. I'm interested in how they used their own variation of this centuries-old hand and the style is unique enough that it stands out to me as the most beautiful. I love this script.



https://i.imgur.com/f7NzCew.jpg See that ^ in HD.

So I started developing Dreaming In Script by running a series of 12-week classes at my studio in Hillsboro, Oregon. I tested the full curriculum with six different students privately for twelve weeks. Refined some more, and then set out to make this course.

What does the course look like?

The twelve sections follow a pretty straight-forward and logical progression. I can outline them simply by breaking them into thirds.

1/3: This third of the course focuses on developing a frame of reference for the ensuing practice. You learn about some history, strokes, pen control. We start by setting up expectations and helping to develop an eye for what kind of fidelity you're looking for in your strokes. The students in the course regularly come back to this section after making it through to later areas of the curriculum. It helps to digest these models and ideas several times.

2/3: This second third of the course focuses on developing your understanding of the minuscule forms, which are assembled from things we learn in the first section. We introduce some aspects of stylistic variation. I don't mean flourishing, I mean hunting down specimens of writing from various penmen and adopting big picture styles. There is a lot of variation in historical specimens and you can have a number of different influences that make ES look radically different from one penman to the next.

3/3 This last third of the course focuses on the Majuscule forms, writing, and several small projects. I really wanted to take students through to a point where they feel like they can employ their writing for its utility. The projects at the end are set up as role-play scenarios where you are a penman from the early 20th century, and you're being tasked with a project for a certain reason. Kinda fun!

---

If any of this sounds like something you're interested in, please feel free to head over to Dreaming In Script and take a look. There are a couple of preview lessons available so you can see what they look like. Each lesson tends to have some combination of videos, diagrams, and essays. I include quite a few scans from my personal collection and those are all presented in super high-resolution so that you can get into the details and see what these old penmen were up to while they were setting our generation up for all of the incredible work that we're going to be doing over the next few decades. I get excited just thinking about it!

Here's a link. Thanks for reading!

http://bit.ly/DIS_FF



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Calligraphy Guilds / Guilds by State
« on: May 01, 2016, 10:38:45 AM »
http://www.friendsofcalligraphy.org/pages/resources.html

A list of state organizations in the US. :)

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Workshops & Conference News / A New Beginning In Script Writing
« on: January 04, 2016, 11:20:36 PM »
Hey Guys!

Towards the end of the month, I'm teaching a 4 hour workshop in Portland, Oregon on script writing. This will cover the basics of the oblique holder, some standard Engrosser's Script ductus work, and a few different style variations to give your script some personality and allow you to get started exploring the creative side of writing. I'm really excited to get to teach this curriculum, as it'll be the first class I'm teaching that's designed for absolute beginners. If you're around on the 23rd, check it out!

http://www.shop-fieldtrip.com/shop/a-new-beginning-in-script-writing

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Hope you guys enjoy. Did this one just for fun!

http://i.imgur.com/DWJZVUL.jpg

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Open Flourish | General Discussion / Calligraskype Sessions
« on: March 09, 2015, 01:44:16 PM »
Hey Guys!

So I've been jumping on Skype pretty regularly with a few calligraphers on here for the past few months, and I thought it would be fun to 'meet' some more of you. Basically, we'd just hang out on skype while we practice/talk about calligraphy/whatever, and get to know the people behind the IG profiles and forum posts.

Anyway, if you're interested, either post your skype name here, or DM me, and lets set up a time to practice together.

Hope everyone had a good weekend! It was beautiful over here in Portland.

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Flourishing / Peacemaker inspired flourished revolver
« on: February 25, 2015, 02:08:34 PM »
http://i.imgur.com/SIf5DRv.jpg

Too big to share inline here, but I wanted to upload a high res version in case any of you who saw it on Instagram wanted to get a good look at all the mistakes!

It was quite fun to make, but I'm sure if I knew the first thing about offhand it'd be a million times cleaner. What do you guys think?

*edited link

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Design & Layout / Layout And Design For Calligraphers - Alan Furber
« on: February 25, 2015, 02:03:28 PM »
Click on image to view on Amazon (affiliate link):

I picked this little paperback up from my local book store on Monday and have really enjoyed it! It's only about 60 pages, and you can get a used copy on Amazon directly from Alan for $1.00. The examples in the book are largely Italic and Foundational, but the principals can be used for composing any variety of projects.

Post back here if you pick a copy up, I'd love to discuss!

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Digital Design / Horizontal Vertical Bezier Handles
« on: January 04, 2015, 11:57:15 AM »
A few of my favorite writeups on the nuance of point placement, curve construction and handle orientation in Illustrator.

A basic overview of point placement and handle orientation.

http://theagsc.com/community/tutorials/so-whats-the-big-deal-with-horizontal-vertical-bezier-handles-anyway

An in depth explanation of extrema placement, curve construction, and vector theory.

http://learn.scannerlicker.net/2014/04/16/bezier-curves-and-type-design-a-tutorial/

Some examples of tricky problems with curves and their solutions

http://learn.scannerlicker.net/2014/09/16/bezier-curve-quick-tips-two-methods-for-smooth-curves/

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Broad Edge Pen Calligraphy / I ain't got no type - Uncial
« on: January 03, 2015, 12:14:26 PM »


Saw some interesting quotes in Uncial yesterday, decided to go with this phrase because of the interesting diagonal trend of the T's.

Sorry for the intense DOF, the texture and light on the lettering was too good to miss out on the tilt-shift.

I know it's improperly rounded and spaced, but anyone have thoughts/advice?

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Waiting on a box of Hunt 101 nibs to show up in the mail (as recommended by Joi!) but I can't keep myself from doodling. Flattened the top of that T just for Joi, who was busting my butt about it in a shot I sent her. Haha! Happy New Year everyone!

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I've been doing lettering work for about two years now. I got my start with Parallel Pens after watching Seb Lester's fraktur video on Vimeo. Since then, I've been devouring all of the info I can on broad nib and brush scripts. I've recently started to show more interest in Copperplate, and Joi has been answering all of my questions over her Instagram (Thanks, Joi!). I'm excited to read around on here and give back any way I can.

If anyone is in Portland and would like to meet up to practice, I know of a bunch of good places or can host out of my home. I would love to connect with more Portland artists!

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