Recent Posts

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Introductions / Re: Hello From Canada
« Last post by Bianca M on Today at 07:18:52 PM »
Welcome to the forum, Bev!
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Spencerian Script / Re: Writing Small
« Last post by Bianca M on Today at 07:17:32 PM »
Wow!!!  I love that these even smaller pieces are making it through.  @Erica McPhee, I love the tiny mail exchange idea!
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Introductions / Re: Hello from Drew
« Last post by jrvalverde on Today at 04:38:22 PM »
Welcome drew. It's a pleasure to have more people joining the forum. I hope all has gone well with your health adínd you can enjoy the warmth and friendship of the forum as soon as possible.
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Spencerian Script / Re: Writing Small
« Last post by AnasaziWrites on Today at 03:56:23 PM »
This is quite interesting. Now I'm going to have to try some tiny writing.
@AAAndrew
Wonderful. Would love to see it

Quote
As for the original letter, by 1850 steel pens were quite common. It was the quills which were becoming rarer. Most pens at that point were British imports, with the Gillott 303 as the most popular.  Perry pens were also popular. The stiffer, wider pens (like the oval point, and stub nibs) weren't popular, or even produced, until later in the century.

The seal on the back was called a wafer. The early ones were created out of a "batter of fine wheaten flour, the gluten of which is of an adhesive nature, mixed with white of egg, isinglass, and coloring agents..." (from Western Writing Implements by Michael Finlay)  This mixture was heated and pressed into a sheet, which, when dry, was cut into circles, and other shapes. It was licked and helped hold the paper together. They were sold in boxes in various colors, and shapes.

Wafers fell out of favor around 1840 when the gummed envelop came into fashion, about the same time as postage stamps. Some less complex wafers, which were really just gummed pieces of paper and which imitated earlier wax seals were still sold. That may be what you have, but it could be an earlier form, it's hard to tell from the photo.

That's very interesting about wafers. The envelope itself is just a folded piece of paper, no gum, so perhaps it's the earlier form you mention. It definitely is three dimensional, as opposed to a printed design and is quite complex for such a little thing. I'll have to look into this area. Fascinating.

Quote
Being me, I would love to know what pen you're using for writing this small
For 1/32 x-ht, a vintage Gillott 170 works best overall. A G303 is not sharp enough, nor is a Gillott 604ef, both of which I use for 1/18 and larger.  I've tried an Esterbrook 355, which might be a little sharper, but it's a little too flexible. Less than 1/32, a Gillott 659 Crow quill does nicely and has the needed stiffness. It doesn't lay down much ink, though, so the lettering is somewhat faint. I may try sumi ink to get blacker letters. All the letters so far have been done with McCaffery's Penman'sBlack ink (not the gloss kind--that stuff takes forever to dry).
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Introductions / Re: Hello, I am Matt from Southeastern PA!
« Last post by jrvalverde on Today at 03:00:10 PM »
Welcome!

Layout takes you into the grey area where Calligraphy melts with other Arts. You may also find instructive and entertaining learning about how it is approached from other Arts; look for documents on "composition" which is how it is referred to by graphical artists (painters, photographers...).

This is specially more interesting as you progress from writing into mixing letters and graphics, something all of us fall for sooner or later.
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Really, thanks. It is a wonderful work.
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Spencerian Script / Re: Writing Small
« Last post by AAAndrew on Today at 12:11:20 PM »
This is quite interesting. Now I'm going to have to try some tiny writing.

As for the original letter, by 1850 steel pens were quite common. It was the quills which were becoming rarer. Most pens at that point were British imports, with the Gillott 303 as the most popular.  Perry pens were also popular. The stiffer, wider pens (like the oval point, and stub nibs) weren't popular, or even produced, until later in the century.

The seal on the back was called a wafer. The early ones were created out of a "batter of fine wheaten flour, the gluten of which is of an adhesive nature, mixed with white of egg, isinglass, and coloring agents..." (from Western Writing Implements by Michael Finlay)  This mixture was heated and pressed into a sheet, which, when dry, was cut into circles, and other shapes. It was licked and helped hold the paper together. They were sold in boxes in various colors, and shapes.

Wafers fell out of favor around 1840 when the gummed envelop came into fashion, about the same time as postage stamps. Some less complex wafers, which were really just gummed pieces of paper and which imitated earlier wax seals were still sold. That may be what you have, but it could be an earlier form, it's hard to tell from the photo.

Being me, I would love to know what pen you're using for writing this small, @AnasaziWrites .
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Open Flourish | General Discussion / Re: Step up your envelope game
« Last post by JanisTX on Today at 10:19:43 AM »
Thanks, @AAAndrew!  Those envelopes are adorable!!

Janis
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Spencerian Script / Re: Writing Small
« Last post by Erica McPhee on Today at 10:06:27 AM »
What fun!!! And they are so elegant and beautiful! We *must* do a tiny exchange next year.

And I agree - someone at the post office was a bit passive aggressive with that cancellation. Kind of like, "I'll show you how much I liked having to hand cancel this envelope and ruin your beautiful mail."  >:( :(
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Open/Active Exchanges / Re: Holiday Hellos 2019
« Last post by Erica McPhee on Today at 10:02:40 AM »
Thanks @waterconfidence  and @passionforwriting

Welcome back @Joel ! We've missed you, too! I hope you are well my friend!  :-*
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