Author Topic: Introduction (please read this first)  (Read 22666 times)

Offline JAHT

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Re: Introduction (please read this first)
« Reply #45 on: April 12, 2018, 07:24:54 AM »
@Salman Khattak
Hi again Salman,
I am a bit heavy-handed, but when I've written about 5-7 pages of random words and phrases, the nib begins to catch the paper mainly when I try to close the tines when squaring off.
I'm using a 14x17 inch Canson Mixed Media pad.
We get a lot of sea blast here, so metals corrode Very Quickly.
Lightening up on the pressure has definitely helped with my upstroke.
Thank you for the advice. :D

Offline Crane

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Re: Introduction (please read this first)
« Reply #46 on: June 20, 2018, 02:06:20 AM »
Hello

I just made an order for an oblique holder (I'm from Finland, had to order one from the US) and a few nibs (Hunt 101's and Nikko G's). I will have to try source ink and paper locally, what attributes should I be looking for in those? Also, should I try to adjust the oblique holder in some way when I get it, or just go "straight from the box"?

Your lessons here seem like a really great way to get started, thanks in advance! Now just have to wait a couple of weeks for the shipment to arrive...  :-[

Offline Salman Khattak

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Re: Introduction (please read this first)
« Reply #47 on: June 26, 2018, 05:25:02 PM »
Welcome to FF @Crane

The Hunt 101 is one of my favourite nibs. The Nikko G is also a very good nib and is quite forgiving so a good one to have at the start.

Walnut ink (or Vandyke crystals used for staining wood) is probably the best for practice. It flows well, works with most nibs and is easy to clean. A few fountain pen inks work too: Pelikan Black, Pelikan Brilliant Brown, Noodler's Black (with about 40% water added), Parker Quink Blue Black are a few.

You will need to experiment a bit to see which paper works with the nib and ink of your choice. Thicker is not always better. Some of the best papers are very thin - they are just sized (size is the stuff they add to paper during manufacture) very well. HP LaserJet Premium is a good paper but a bit on the pricey side. Rhodia pads are also very good but can be expensive for practice.

Don't be afraid of trying cheap paper either. I had great luck with cheap printer paper from a local Dollar store but the quality varied from batch to batch.

The brass flange on your oblique holder may need to be adjusted for your nib. Make the curve flatter if the nib goes in too easily and falls out. Make the curve rounder if it is too tight. (I know this sounds opposite of what one expects :-)

Best of luck on your calligraphic journey. I will be looking forward to your joining the lessons.

Salman
I have an opinion and I'm not afraid to use it.

Copperplate Tutorial :: Toronto Pen Company

Offline NevadaDeb

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Re: Introduction (please read this first)
« Reply #48 on: August 16, 2018, 11:56:52 PM »
Hello Everyone, and our esteemed instructor,

I’m Debi from Las Vegas, Nevada. This is my first journey into pointed pen, though I have studied and practiced broad-edged pen hands for 4 decades. I’m probably the oldest member of the forum, and I have the wrinkles to prove it! My favorite hand was always Cancelleresca Corsiva, until I took the plunge and tried the pointed pen. I was instantly hooked. I can’t imagine why I’d been avoiding it for all these years. There is a wonderful, calming rhythm that is mesmerizing with the opening and closing of the tines, and I find practice amazingly relaxing. I also love studying the historical beginnings of all scripts, and the letterforms of master scribes. I have found Salman’s tutorial to be stunning in its depth and detail, sharing nuances that I have not found in other tutorials.

I find the approach to learning to be very compatible to how I best learn: practicing in groups of five letters, marking the best ones of the five, then making five more letters as much like the best in the first group of five—to be very helpful. I do not get fatigued this way, as it allows me to pause, relax my hand, and use my eyes and brain to look at each letter and find the strengths and weaknesses, then build upon those strengths.

I find I learn more from my mistakes than my successes. Mistakes are a roadmap for me, and force me to closely examine what it is that makes it NOT work. Salman’s tutorial approach is one of great positivity—it builds upon the strengths, and acknowledges that weaknesses are simply stepping stones that allow us to see better what DOES work.

I think I spend as much if not more time right now studying master penmen’s work than I do in practicing letterforms. I learn so much studying their styles, and trying to find those elements that make the script sing. The Universal Penman is like a book of script arias!

My pointed pen journey is just beginning, and this is my first 10 days of serious practice and study. I’m finding it challenging to “unlearn” habits formed from using a broad pen for so long. I look and laugh at my wobbles, bobbles, blobs and spatters, as I try to follow the great instructions in Group I letterforms. Nothing, absolutely nothing is consistent yet. Fortunately, I enjoy the journey!

I thank you all for sharing here, and for putting up your work! I have been very inspired by what students have done in such a short time, and how quickly they have improved by learning the core elements of letterforms, the spacing, the consistency in angles, the hairlines that get more and more steady, and those tall ascenders and descenders that can be so challenging. I think you all move much faster than I do, and I don’t expect to keep pace with you!

Finally, a rousing THANK YOU to Salman for so freely sharing his expertise and skill, to help serious students study their own efforts and learn to see all those nuances that eventually turn the craft into art. He’s not teaching us a particular style, but the skeleton forms that make the base of all good letters. This solid base he offers will allow each of us to eventually develop our own style, but one in which we have learned to see when something is not working and how to fix it. This is priceless information for us all. Thank you, Salman. What an honor and privilege to be here and have you help us on our journey!

Offline Salman Khattak

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Re: Introduction (please read this first)
« Reply #49 on: August 18, 2018, 04:25:15 PM »
@NevadaDeb

Hello Debi. It is my pleasure and honour to welcome you to this series of lessons on Copperplate.

Thank you so much for your kind words. I am so glad you found these instructions useful. I do indeed try to get the basic structure and understanding of the script across rather than a particular style and encourage experimentation outside of the lessons. The exemplars in my lessons only serve as a common ground for the students' work and my feedback. My hope is that going through the four groups will give a student enough control to add variations of their own with an understanding of what works and why.

I am looking forward to your participation.

Kind Regards,
Salman
I have an opinion and I'm not afraid to use it.

Copperplate Tutorial :: Toronto Pen Company

Offline ShalinaSalim

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Re: Introduction (please read this first)
« Reply #50 on: February 17, 2019, 03:27:41 PM »
Hello Salman,

I am Shalina and I am new to Calligraphy. I have been trying to write in different styles and could not get any better. Then I met someone who suggested by seeing what I have been writing, that I should concentrate on copperplate calligraphy and she pointed me to the forum and I am really looking forward to get better in writing. Thank you.

Best regards,
Shalina

Offline lyric

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Re: Introduction (please read this first)
« Reply #51 on: July 22, 2020, 06:16:17 PM »
This is something I wish were a current venture.  Mr. Khattak is highly esteemed.  I can be thankful that this has all been preserved here and I plan to learn all that I can.

Thank you Ms. McPhee and Mr. Khattak for this forum.  :)
Scribbalicously yours, Lyric
Calligraphy Journey began 01.06.2020
Penwomanship began 10/2020 :-)

Offline RoseliGomes

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Re: Introduction (please read this first)
« Reply #52 on: September 30, 2020, 09:11:18 AM »
Good Morning

I´m in Brazil and since july I´m training - I suppose is English Houndhand.
I find this forum and I will try understand your class and sharing my evolution..
I have some difficults to find a NIB, but I´m using pencil in a moment
Thanks for sharing.

Roseli

Offline Salman Khattak

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Re: Introduction (please read this first)
« Reply #53 on: November 04, 2020, 11:42:34 AM »
Hello everyone. It is good to see the interest in these lessons. I am glad they continue to serve the purpose I intended them to serve.

I should apologize for dropping off the radar back there. I never thought my little break will extend this much to be honest. I will try my best to be back on a semi-regular basis.

As for the lessons, I think there is much to be gained from studying feedback given to previous students. We were at a point where I was pretty much repeating the same things. I know this means a bit more work for people but there's nothing like developing a sharp eye to improve one's calligraphy.

Welcome @ShalinaSalim @lyric and @RoseliGomes - please do share your work as you go through the lessons. I am sure you will get good feedback from others even if I'm a bit late in responding. Regularity in practice is much more important than the amount of practice - let no day go by without putting ink on paper even if it is one word...or even one letter.

- Salman
I have an opinion and I'm not afraid to use it.

Copperplate Tutorial :: Toronto Pen Company

Offline Erica McPhee

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Re: Introduction (please read this first)
« Reply #54 on: December 12, 2020, 11:43:28 AM »
Hi Salman,
So nice to see you stop by! You have already contributed so much to our community! It is understandable it is difficult to keep repeating your words of wisdom. Just wanted to say hello and thank you for everything you have done for us!  ;D
Truly, Erica
Lettering/Design Artist, Homeopath, Photographer, Mom, Wife
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Offline Salman Khattak

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Re: Introduction (please read this first)
« Reply #55 on: December 21, 2020, 03:49:46 PM »
Thank you so much for the kind words Erica. It has been my pleasure and honour to be a part of this community. I will be hanging around and helping as and when needed.

I have an opinion and I'm not afraid to use it.

Copperplate Tutorial :: Toronto Pen Company