Author Topic: Walnut ink crystals -lightfast?  (Read 134 times)

Offline candlejackstraw

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Walnut ink crystals -lightfast?
« on: September 04, 2019, 04:13:50 PM »
Hello, I've been googling all over and trying to find out if walnut ink, made from crystals, is lightfast? Meaning, is it acceptable to put works on the wall? (Obviously not in direct sunlight.) Heres a picture of a bottle I have.
Experiences, water mixture ratios, etc are welcome as well :)

Just in case the picture doesnt post.. its Imagine Brand Walnut Ink Crystals

Offline Erica McPhee

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Re: Walnut ink crystals -lightfast?
« Reply #1 on: September 05, 2019, 11:10:57 AM »
That is a great question. I'm not sure the correct answer. DaVinci used real walnut ink which did fade over time (and deteriorate the paper).

Imagine does state that their walnut ink is archival which means it is meant to resist fading and weathering. They don't specifically mention if their crystals are any different though.

Norton's walnut ink is made with artist pigments so is also touted as lightfast and archival and acid free so it doesn't degrade the paper. Tsukineko walnut crystals also specify they are archival.

To be 100% sure, perhaps send a message to Imagine to double check if their crystals are archival like the walnut ink.  ;)
Truly, Erica
Lettering/Design Artist, Homeopath, Photographer, Mom, Wife
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Offline Erica McPhee

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Re: Walnut ink crystals -lightfast?
« Reply #2 on: September 05, 2019, 11:16:24 AM »
P.S. If you search walnut from the home page, there are a bunch of threads about walnut ink. But this one has lots of good info!

Making your own Walnut Ink
Truly, Erica
Lettering/Design Artist, Homeopath, Photographer, Mom, Wife
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Offline Ergative

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Re: Walnut ink crystals -lightfast?
« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2019, 05:09:30 PM »
I've heard Michael Sull say that walnut ink is not lightfast. But Erica's comments make it sound as if there are many different flavours of walnut ink, some of which are and some of which are not.
Clara

Offline RD5

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Re: Walnut ink crystals -lightfast?
« Reply #4 on: September 16, 2019, 01:03:08 PM »
Here is a blog article on Walnut ink: http://artafter.blogspot.com/2015/12/walnut-ink.html?m=1

It casts doubt on Da Vinci etc. using it, unfortunately the lightfastness test results are still on going, even though the article is several years old.

Other sources suggest that it fades, but only slightly. Which would explain the contradictory claims.

Offline Estefa

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Re: Walnut ink crystals -lightfast?
« Reply #5 on: September 18, 2019, 07:18:05 AM »
The walnut ink I buy is lightfast, according to its producer, and I haven't had complaints so far :).

https://www.kalligraphie.com/store/product_info.php/language/en/info/p1384_Nussbaumtinte-50ml.html/?x4d239=ai50krfive41b47tj3aq6rstm1

Iím also not sure about Da Vinci, that would be interesting to know! I always assumed what he used to write was iron gall ink (which after some centuries turns brown and looks a bit like walnut ink Ö).
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Offline Daniel McGill

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Re: Walnut ink crystals -lightfast?
« Reply #6 on: September 25, 2019, 04:02:10 PM »
Organic walnut ink (from the walnut itself) is not light-fast as it naturally ages and deteriorates. Walnut ink crystals are similar to their fully synthetic counterparts in that they are partially lightfast. What I mean by this is the process to make the crystals reduces the natural decay of the walnut and makes it last a lot longer (decades) that it's fully natural sibling.